Search Results: "E.B. Lewis"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 6, 2014

"The richness of this book's words and images will inspire readers to learn more about this holiday that never should have been necessary…but was. (Web resources, glossary) (Picture book. 5-9)"
Johnson tells a tale of Juneteenth in Texas through the eyes of a child, while Lewis' earth-toned watercolor illustrations capture the quotidian aspects of the way of life emancipation ended. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARS ABOVE US by Geoffrey Norman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"A flawed but welcome addition to the sparse cadre of trade titles on this topic. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Norman's first picture book explores a child's fear of the dark as a manifestation of, and metaphor for, acute separation anxiety. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEEDS OF FREEDOM by Hester Bass
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 27, 2015

"A book that is as quietly inspiring as its subject. (author's note, photographs, selected bibliography) (Informational picture book. 5-8)"
Peaceful but forceful protest ended segregation in one Southern town. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I WANT TO BE FREE by Joseph Slate
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2009

"Not up to either contributor's standards, but a passable selection where slave tales or Christian inspirational tales are needed. (Picture book. 6-8)"
"Before I die, I want to be free. / But the Big Man says, ‘You belong to me.' " A young slave in the South escapes only to be tracked down and shackled, but he manages to break free again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEGRO SPEAKS OF RIVERS by Langston Hughes
POETRY
Released: Jan. 6, 2009

"The beautifully reverent, serene cover image will persuade all to look inside. (Picture book. 5 & up)"
A visual paean to Hughes's enduring poem, Lewis's images make a personal connection to a taproot of feelings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"Brave Bessie Coleman," the first black woman in the world to earn a pilot's license, has been the subject of several recent picture book biographies: (Fly, Bessie, Fly, by Lynn Joseph, 1998; Fly High!, by Louise Borden and Mary Kay Kroeger, 2001; Nobody Owns the Sky, by Reeve Lindbergh, 1996). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

A valentine to the renowned Savoy, narrated by a lad born on the day it opened in 1926 and illustrated with eye-filling watercolors featuring sharply dressed hep cats and hot, high-steppin' crowds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEEPING THE NIGHT WATCH by Hope Anita Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2008

"Something of a disappointment visually, but the essential poignancy shines through. (Poetry. 10-14)"
C.J. and his family return in this companion to 2003's The Way a Door Closes, winner of the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award for New Talent in 2004. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I LOVE MY HAIR! by Natasha Anastasia Tarpley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Lewis's imaginative and warm interpretations of these exchanges as well as the inclusion of bits of African-American cultural history expand the personal content. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Tarpley's first book for children joins a growing list of titles about African-American hair—linking it to issues of self- esteem and acceptance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CIRCLE UNBROKEN by Margot Theis Raven
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2004

In solemn Gullah cadences, an old woman passes on to a grandchild centuries of history embodied in the Sea Islands' distinctive sweetgrass baskets, as in equally solemn watercolors, Lewis takes the tale from an ancestral African village, through the Middle Passage and slavery days, to changes brought by the automobile and distant modern wars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE CLIFF’S FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL by Clifton L. Taulbert
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2001

"An affecting sequel to Little Cliff and the Porch People (1999) that was the first to offer some of Taulbert's characters from his adult memoirs to young readers. (Picture book. 5-7)"
The first day of first grade looms, and Little Cliff has sadly lined up his toys to bid goodbye: " ‘I can't play with y'all no more. Read full book review >