Search Results: "E.L. Konigsburg"


BOOK REVIEW

THROWING SHADOWS by E.L. Konigsburg
Released: Aug. 14, 1979

"All the stories are more rounded and sprinkled with anecdote than what is usually called didactic in children's fiction, yet all the characters—and their stories—are so reduced to those final moments of truth or virtue shining forth that the experience is a mild and managed one."
Throwing shadows, kindling flames: each of the five innocuous short stories included here ends in a sort of character-defining gesture or understanding. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SILENT TO THE BONE by E.L. Konigsburg
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"What starts out as an intriguing plot turns predictable, but Konigsburg's characters and the textures of their relationships are fascinating and worth every minute spent with them. (Fiction. 11-13)"
The small New York town in which Konigsburg offered a View From Saturday (1996, Newbery Medal) is again the setting for a series of rich and subtle studies in friendship and family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

(GEORGE) by E.L. Konigsburg
illustrated by E.L. Konigsburg
Released: Oct. 20, 1970

"In current fiction, a boy with a problem seldom has it so good."
Parentheses because George is Ben's concentric twin, his loudmouthed inner voice, or, as Mrs. Konigsburg puts it in a nutshell. . . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OUTCASTS OF 19 SCHUYLER PLACE by E.L. Konigsburg
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"This it does with every word in place, occasionally indulging in dizzying linguistic riffs, always conscious of the ironies inherent in the acts of living and growing up. (Fiction. 10+)"
Master novelist Konigsburg hones her sense of irony to a razor edge in this exploration of the backstory behind one of Silent to the Bone's secondary characters: Connor's older half-sister Margaret. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VIEW FROM SATURDAY by E.L. Konigsburg
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"The large cast, looping plot line, and embedded stories with different narrators require careful sorting, but the effort is eminently worthwhile, and Konigsburg kindly provides answers at the end. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Admirable acts, challenging ideas, and grace notes positively festoon this superb tale of four sixth graders and a paraplegic teacher forming a junior high Academic Bowl team that sweeps away the competition. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FATHER'S ARCANE DAUGHTER by E.L. Konigsburg
Released: Aug. 18, 1976

"For them, there will be a certain hermetic appeal; otherwise this is a mark-time exercise in a minor key."
Layers of mystery. . . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 21, 1967

"On balance, we find it a fresh, funny spoof of the adult Establishment and the cliches of conjuring."

BOOK REVIEW

AMY ELIZABETH EXPLORES BLOOMINGDALE'S by E.L. Konigsburg
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1992

"Understated, witty, and right on target; creatively extended in the author's perceptive, warmly colorful illustrations. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Amy Elizabeth is visiting Grandma in New York; each day, Grandma plans to take her to "Bloomie's," but there's always something else they should do first: walk the dog, visit Chinatown to get green tea, go to a laundromat, or share lox and bagels and the Sunday Times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAMUEL TODD'S BOOK OF GREAT COLORS by E.L. Konigsburg
Released: Feb. 1, 1990

"A useful, mildly provocative concept book."
In her first picture book, the author of the longest-titled Newbery Award and Newbery Honor books (both 1967) puts a cheerful new spin on a tried, and-true topic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 10, 1974

"Presumably, now she won't have to spend her energies flirting with ghetto dragons—though Konigsburg seems unaware to the end that Edie's caper (it used to be called slumming) is as distasteful as her all-round aid to Andy is deflating."
An eleven-year-old aspiring detective seeking a sidekick who will "yes, boss" him takes up with a lonely young housewife in his upper-income suburb, and even if you can credit a kid like Andy being so interested in Edie Yakots' self-preoccupied prattle and her frequent references to "Harry—that's my husband" that he visits her daily after school, you still might question how many others his age will want to read about her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UP FROM JERICHO TEL by E.L. Konigsburg
Released: March 1, 1986

"The story is told with a light touch but contains some substance as well—a good exploration of aspirations to and attainment of fame."
In Konigsburg's novel, her two talented child protagonists, Jeanmarie and Malcolm, learn the three requirements for fame in a sometimes whimsical, sometimes mysterious tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECOND MRS. GIOCONDA by E.L. Konigsburg
Released: Sept. 10, 1975

"At this civilized midcult level Konigsburg is successful, mixing palatable art history with mildly ingenious conjecture, and she probably should not be faulted for not having a Salai of her own."
Around a few entries in Leonardo's notebooks Konigsburg constructs the character of his young apprentice Salai and fabricates an answer to two questions. Read full book review >