Search Results: "Ed Offley"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2011

"An intensely focused account that cuts through the battle's sprawl and duration, supplying the general reader with an appreciation of its character and importance."
A military reporter examines the climax of "the longest and deadliest naval conflict in world history." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BURNING SHORE by Ed Offley
NON-FICTION
Released: March 25, 2014

"A knowledgeable overview and exciting re-creation of the final U-701 attack and defeat."
An authoritative work on the awful, early effectiveness of German U-boats in disrupting shipping traffic off the east coast of the United States. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BYE-BYE, BIG BAD BULLYBUG! by Ed Emberley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"The building of suspense should appeal to very young listeners, who also might be attracted to the accessibility of the minimal text and who will welcome a new Monster to the neighborhood. (Picture book. 2-5)"
In a return to the concept that produced the brilliant Go Away Big Green Monster (1993), Emberley offers a new character to stand up to. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I, DOKO by Ed Young
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"The dynamic, jewel-toned pastel, collage and gouache illustrations, bordered and flecked with gold give dignity, richness and power to a traditional Asian tale that embodies both the Golden Rule and respect for the elderly. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The epigraph from Kung Fu Tze—"What one wishes not upon oneself, one burdens not upon another"—aptly summarizes this simple parable set in Nepal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEVEN BLIND MICE by Ed Young
ANIMALS
Released: April 29, 1992

"Exquisitely crafted: a simple, gracefully honed text, an appealing story, real but unobtrusive values and levels of meaning, and outstanding illustrations and design—all add up to a perfect book. (Picture book. 3+)"
A many-talented illustrator (Lon Po Po, 1989, Caldecott Medal) uses a new medium—collage—in an innovative reworking of ``The Blind Men and the Elephant,'' with splendid results: a book that casually rehearses the days of the week, numbers (ordinal and cardinal), and colors while memorably explicating and extending the theme: ``Knowing in part may make a fine tale, but wisdom comes from seeing the whole.'' The mice (first seen as an intriguing row of bright tails on the elegantly spare black title spread) are the colors of the rainbow plus white; they, the white text, and the parts of the elephant (as they really are and as the mice imagine them) are superimposed on a dramatic black ground. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAT AND RAT by Ed Young
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Inclusion of a page of horoscopes along with the Gregorian equivalents to the animals' years will intrigue readers, but the story may not keep them involved to the end. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
According to the notes at the beginning of the book, when the Chinese calendar was created, the animals ran a race, and the 12 who came in first had a year named after them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 2009

"An engrossing feast for the eyes and the emotions.

"
A painter plumbs dark subjects—anxiety, loss, 9/11—with a deceptively simple and bright style in this lush coffee-table art book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE’S MY SWEETIE PIE? by Ed Emberley
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2010

"Unfortunately, the flaps, while easy for clumsy little fingers to manipulate, are also on the flimsy side—chances are good they'll wear out all too soon. (Board book. 1-3)"
The titular question encourages readers to lift flaps in search of the sweetie pie in question. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IF YOU LIVED HERE YOU’D BE HOME BY NOW by Ed Briant
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"Affecting, and a nice choice for family sharing. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Briant's latest, a wordless fable about imperiled nature, spans two generations in colorful panels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONKEY LOST by Ed Heck
by Ed Heck, illustrated by Ed Heck
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"A bit sketchy, but the familiar situation, a bit of silliness and some authentically conveyed feeling add up to a Heck of a solo debut. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Any child who's ever lost track of a prized companion will feel for young Eric, who suddenly realizes that the monkey he was bringing to school for show-and-tell is gone. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED THREAD by Ed Young
by Ed Young, illustrated by Ed Young
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 24, 1993

"Another splendid achievement for this fine artist. (No source given, but LC classes this in 398.21.) (Folklore/Picture book. 4+)"
With an imaginative, innovative use of traditional elements of Chinese art recalling Young's Lon Po Po (1990 Caldecott Medal), another spellbinding Chinese tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VOICES OF THE HEART by Ed Young
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

A labor of love for a versatile illustrator (see review, above) introduces some Chinese characters and invites readers to muse upon human nature. Read full book review >