Search Results: "Ed Vere"


BOOK REVIEW

MAX THE BRAVE by Ed Vere
by Ed Vere, illustrated by Ed Vere
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"A cat-and-mouse game to be laughed at and reread. (Picture book. 3-5)"
The time-worn scenario in which mouse outwits cat gets a fresh new spin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEDTIME FOR MONSTERS by Ed Vere
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 17, 2012

"Share this cartoonish, mock-horror tale with the not-so-sleepy at bedtime or rely upon it as a superb storytime choice where all can have fun participating in the hilarious sound effects. (Picture book. 3-6)"
"Do YOU ever WONDER if somewhere, not too far away, there might be… / MONSTERS?" Whether readers do or not, it is hard to resist being swept up in the silly suspense of possibly becoming the target for this monster's hungry attention. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GETAWAY by Ed Vere
by Ed Vere, illustrated by Ed Vere
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 18, 2007

"Better guard your gorgonzola. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Inviting readers to be his lookouts, and whistle ("You know how to whistle, don't you? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX AT NIGHT by Ed Vere
by Ed Vere, illustrated by Ed Vere
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 3, 2016

"Cozy, dozy, comforting fare. (Picture book. 3-5)"
A nocturnal quest yields great rewards for the little black cat with the big yellow eyes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BANANA! by Ed Vere
by Ed Vere, illustrated by Ed Vere
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 23, 2010

Using only the words "banana" and "please," Vere tells a story about two monkeys and one coveted fruit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX AND BIRD by Ed Vere
by Ed Vere, illustrated by Ed Vere
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"Real warmth followed by a rush of triumph helps make this book stand out. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Friendship wins out over natural instincts in another outing with the big-eyed black cat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOO NOISY! by Malachy Doyle
by Malachy Doyle, illustrated by Ed Vere
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 11, 2012

"Quiet thinkers will enjoy meeting a character like themselves, and others may gain a better understanding of those who crave a little peace. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Everyone in the Bungle family squeaks, squawks and squelches too much for Sam, the quiet, dreamy middle-child creature (the Bungles look vaguely like raccoons). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BYE-BYE, BIG BAD BULLYBUG! by Ed Emberley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"The building of suspense should appeal to very young listeners, who also might be attracted to the accessibility of the minimal text and who will welcome a new Monster to the neighborhood. (Picture book. 2-5)"
In a return to the concept that produced the brilliant Go Away Big Green Monster (1993), Emberley offers a new character to stand up to. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I, DOKO by Ed Young
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"The dynamic, jewel-toned pastel, collage and gouache illustrations, bordered and flecked with gold give dignity, richness and power to a traditional Asian tale that embodies both the Golden Rule and respect for the elderly. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The epigraph from Kung Fu Tze—"What one wishes not upon oneself, one burdens not upon another"—aptly summarizes this simple parable set in Nepal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEVEN BLIND MICE by Ed Young
ANIMALS
Released: April 29, 1992

"Exquisitely crafted: a simple, gracefully honed text, an appealing story, real but unobtrusive values and levels of meaning, and outstanding illustrations and design—all add up to a perfect book. (Picture book. 3+)"
A many-talented illustrator (Lon Po Po, 1989, Caldecott Medal) uses a new medium—collage—in an innovative reworking of ``The Blind Men and the Elephant,'' with splendid results: a book that casually rehearses the days of the week, numbers (ordinal and cardinal), and colors while memorably explicating and extending the theme: ``Knowing in part may make a fine tale, but wisdom comes from seeing the whole.'' The mice (first seen as an intriguing row of bright tails on the elegantly spare black title spread) are the colors of the rainbow plus white; they, the white text, and the parts of the elephant (as they really are and as the mice imagine them) are superimposed on a dramatic black ground. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAT AND RAT by Ed Young
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Inclusion of a page of horoscopes along with the Gregorian equivalents to the animals' years will intrigue readers, but the story may not keep them involved to the end. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
According to the notes at the beginning of the book, when the Chinese calendar was created, the animals ran a race, and the 12 who came in first had a year named after them. Read full book review >