Search Results: "Edmund Blair Bolles"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 16, 1991

"Bolles is more concerned with putting perception on a pedestal than in telling us what it's all about. (Nine line drawings.)"
In spite of the New Age-ish title, the latest from Bolles (Remembering and Forgetting, 1987, etc.) attempts to put perception in proper perspective—not as a mystical phenomenon, but at the very heart of how we comprehend ourselves and the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"Alternatively dry and gripping, with disorienting globe-hopping crosscuts—a science history whose subjects are motivated equally by daft heroism, back-biting egotism, and lonely, frequently despairing moments of insight."
Thrilling scenes of arctic winter animate an episodic examination of how 19th-century scientists slowly used circumstantial evidence to conceive of a distant Ice Age. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND WILSON by Lewis M. Dabney
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"While the general reader will probably be lost throughout a good portion of this collection, it is a neat treat for die-hard Wilsonians."
This solid but too disparate collection of essays and panel discussions (drawn from a series of 1995 symposia celebrating the centenary of his birth) revisits Wilson's life, work, and legacy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BONNIE BLAIR by Cathy Breitenbucher
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 27, 1994

"A rewarding read for kids interested in sports. (Nonfiction. 9-14)"
Breitenbucher, for ten years a sportswriter for the Milwaukee Sentinel, records the amazing career of speed skater Bonnie Blair, who trained in Milwaukee. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND BURKE by Jesse Norman
Released: May 7, 2013

"A top-notch introduction to Burke and his paternity of political systems throughout the Western Hemisphere. Even better, the author points out where ignoring Burke's thoughts have caused unnecessary difficulties."
Member of Parliament Norman (Compassionate Economics, 2008, etc.) comprehensively explains the history and the writings of the man whose thoughts have been quarried by politicians for hundreds of years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND WILSON by Lewis M. Dabney
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 3, 2005

"A solid, much-needed work of literary biography, stronger on matters critical but a touch less absorbing, because less sensational, than Jeffrey Meyers's Edmund Wilson (1995)."
A searching life of the eminent literary critic and journalist 1895-1972). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND UNRAVELS by Andrew Kolb
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 10, 2015

"This long extended metaphor filled with laugh-worthy wordplay will comfort children and parents alike. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Edmund, a ball of teal yarn, explores the world but returns to his family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND WILSON by Jeffrey Meyers
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 8, 1995

"A neat and fluent narrative that will satisfy Wilson fans as well as those who want an introduction to America's Samuel Johnson."
The prolific biographer of Conrad, Poe, and Hemingway (among others) doesn't have to compete with earlier books in this case, since his straightforward account beats to the marketplace even the authorized life—due at some indefinite future date from Wilson editor Lewis Dabney—of America's greatest man of letters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND CAMPION by Evelyn Waugh
Released: June 19, 1946

"Biography in the classical tradition and in the pure prose associated with Waugh, this will have a devotional appeal as well as an intellectual interest, but is not for the wider market of his last."
A biography of Edmund Campion, the gentle scholar- who was forced by the bigotry and persecution of the Elizabethan age into a world of violence, which offers a reverential portrayal, assured scholarship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1935

"It will undoubtedly be overlooked by many Waugh admirers if it is not there, and by Catholic and Protestant alike who enjoy a treat."
The Waughs have a way with them that would intrigue and enchant any modern, but Edmund Campion, Elizabeth's Martyr-Saint would do a proper job even though painted by a brush lacking Waugh's natural flair. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BETRAYAL OF MAGGIE BLAIR by Elizabeth Laird
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 18, 2011

"If Maggie sometimes seems oddly naïve for a person of such an age at that time, her point of view will resonate with teenagers today, as will her death-defying journey, her scrappiness and determination in the face of extreme poverty and little love. (Historical fiction. 11-16)"
Sixteen-year-old Maggie lives a poor life in 17th-century Scotland with her Granny, whose ill temper, foul mouth and skills at healing make her an easy target for the witch-hunting church. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MARY BLAIR TREASURY OF GOLDEN BOOKS by Mary Blair
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 7, 2012

"For Boomers, a nostalgic trip back to their diaper-clad days, and if not exactly multicultural (despite some song lyrics in German and French), still enjoyable for today's young children. (introduction) (Picture book collection. 3-5, adult)"
Despite the art's distinctly retro look and coloring, the five Golden Books in this gathering—four complete, one excerpted—only rarely come off as period pieces. Read full book review >