Search Results: "Edmund Blair Bolles"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 16, 1991

"Bolles is more concerned with putting perception on a pedestal than in telling us what it's all about. (Nine line drawings.)"
In spite of the New Age-ish title, the latest from Bolles (Remembering and Forgetting, 1987, etc.) attempts to put perception in proper perspective—not as a mystical phenomenon, but at the very heart of how we comprehend ourselves and the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"Alternatively dry and gripping, with disorienting globe-hopping crosscuts—a science history whose subjects are motivated equally by daft heroism, back-biting egotism, and lonely, frequently despairing moments of insight."
Thrilling scenes of arctic winter animate an episodic examination of how 19th-century scientists slowly used circumstantial evidence to conceive of a distant Ice Age. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABY ANIMAL FARM by Karen Blair
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 8, 2014

"Here's hoping these youngsters step out for another adventure very soon. (Board book. 6 mos.-2)"
A gaggle of tots meets various baby animals at the farm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GHOST RUNNER by Blair Richmond
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Nov. 15, 2012

"Thoroughly entertaining. (Paranormal romance. 12 & up)"
Vegan vampires, Shakespearean actors, food-co-op aficionados and serious runners face off against old-school bloodsuckers and rapacious, forest-devouring builders in this follow-up to Out of Breath (2011) set in—where else?—Lithia (Ashland in disguise), Ore. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOLASSES FLOOD by Blair Lent
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Attractive and offbeat. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A note explains that, though there really was once a flood when a molasses tank exploded (with tragic consequences not mentioned here), Lent bases his fantastical tale on a story his mother told him as a boy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 23, 1975

"Still the sort of'literature' that E.W. calls 'the result of our rude collisions with reality' is not here."
Borges says that the element that wears least well in writing issur prise. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOME WINE FOR REMEMBRANCE by Edmund Keeley
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"The details of individual stories are gripping and real (Keeley has also written extensively about Greek culture and translated contemporary Greek poetry), but the deposition-style narrative and the dud of an American protagonist keep the story from realizing its dramatic potential."
From prolific novelist Keeley (School for Pagan Lovers, 1993, etc.), a sincere if somewhat uneven story about the Nazi massacre of an entire Greek village near the end of WWII, and the effort decades later to pin the deed on a prominent Austrian statesman (Kurt Waldheim by any other name). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 6, 2008

"The latest gem in the publisher's already glittering Eminent Lives series."
Brief but illuminating biography of the troubled and troubling French poet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILSON'S NIGHT THOUGHTS by Edmund Wilson
Released: Dec. 5, 1961

"For Wilson followers, who are fondly familiar with his writing, this offers some delightful insights."
This is a chronologically arranged collection of prose and poetry (the earliest here, dating from 1917-1919) characterized by spontaneity and wit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCHOOL FOR PAGAN LOVERS by Edmund Keeley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 20, 1993

"Disappointingly lifeless love story that pushes all the right buttons but makes no music."
This seventh novel from Keeley (A Wilderness Called Peace, 1985, etc.), a well-known translator of modern Greek poetry, tells of young lovers crossed by war and fate—a story more enervating than erotic, despite all the lengthy and explicit sex scenes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLYING DIMITRI by Blair Drawson
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"The flight has failed, and perhaps all such flights are doomed to fail, but Dimitri declares himself happy to be homea situation shared by many readers and one that is sufficiently full to be satisfying. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Drawson (Mary Margaret's Tree, 1996) tells a bittersweet, imaginative tale of a boy's bedtime flight, which comes at tooth- brushing time at the end of a happy day—his father's birthday. Read full book review >