Search Results: "Edmund L. Valentine"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 2, 2012

"Those who pore over Valentine's well-researched book will be better positioned to take maximum advantage of—and potentially profit from—the changing U.S. health-care market."
Valentine presents an in-depth and forward-looking assessment of the U.S. health-care market with an eye toward business opportunities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VALENTINE by S.P. Somtow
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Okay for existing vamps, but won't win many new fans."
Sequel to Somtow's 1985 paperback Vampire Junction: more lurid, appalling, spectacular bloodsucking from the splatterpunk author of The Shattered Horse (1986) and Moon Dance (1990). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VALENTINE by Lucius Shepard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2002

"Heavily erotic, lightly plotted: a lover's confection, with a certain sweetness but little sustenance."
His penchant intact for turning familiar landscapes into alien zones, the newest from Shepard (Kalimantan, 1992; The Ends Of The Earth, 1991; etc.) offers a hurricane-tweaked vision of Florida, where two ex-lovers find themselves together again, free to do what comes naturally until the weather clears. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VALENTINE by Tom Savage
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 5, 1996

"A stylish literary entertainment in which the resourceful Savage plays completely fair (or almost) with readers impatient for an immediate solution to his crafty puzzle."
Another slick if divinable suspenser from Savage (Precipice, 1994), Greenwich Village-set, in which a psychopath with a grudge stalks a young mystery writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND WILSON by Lewis M. Dabney
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"While the general reader will probably be lost throughout a good portion of this collection, it is a neat treat for die-hard Wilsonians."
This solid but too disparate collection of essays and panel discussions (drawn from a series of 1995 symposia celebrating the centenary of his birth) revisits Wilson's life, work, and legacy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND BURKE by Jesse Norman
Released: May 7, 2013

"A top-notch introduction to Burke and his paternity of political systems throughout the Western Hemisphere. Even better, the author points out where ignoring Burke's thoughts have caused unnecessary difficulties."
Member of Parliament Norman (Compassionate Economics, 2008, etc.) comprehensively explains the history and the writings of the man whose thoughts have been quarried by politicians for hundreds of years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND WILSON by Lewis M. Dabney
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 3, 2005

"A solid, much-needed work of literary biography, stronger on matters critical but a touch less absorbing, because less sensational, than Jeffrey Meyers's Edmund Wilson (1995)."
A searching life of the eminent literary critic and journalist 1895-1972). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND UNRAVELS by Andrew Kolb
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 10, 2015

"This long extended metaphor filled with laugh-worthy wordplay will comfort children and parents alike. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Edmund, a ball of teal yarn, explores the world but returns to his family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND WILSON by Jeffrey Meyers
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 8, 1995

"A neat and fluent narrative that will satisfy Wilson fans as well as those who want an introduction to America's Samuel Johnson."
The prolific biographer of Conrad, Poe, and Hemingway (among others) doesn't have to compete with earlier books in this case, since his straightforward account beats to the marketplace even the authorized life—due at some indefinite future date from Wilson editor Lewis Dabney—of America's greatest man of letters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND CAMPION by Evelyn Waugh
Released: June 19, 1946

"Biography in the classical tradition and in the pure prose associated with Waugh, this will have a devotional appeal as well as an intellectual interest, but is not for the wider market of his last."
A biography of Edmund Campion, the gentle scholar- who was forced by the bigotry and persecution of the Elizabethan age into a world of violence, which offers a reverential portrayal, assured scholarship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1935

"It will undoubtedly be overlooked by many Waugh admirers if it is not there, and by Catholic and Protestant alike who enjoy a treat."
The Waughs have a way with them that would intrigue and enchant any modern, but Edmund Campion, Elizabeth's Martyr-Saint would do a proper job even though painted by a brush lacking Waugh's natural flair. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Written too soon after the event to stifle self-dramatization—or to touch on the tenuous relationship between actual law practice and classroom drilling—this will be of interest only to masochistic, prospective law students but may mislead them, since Harvard's enormous classes, hothouse ambiance, and rock-rigid first-year requirements are less than representative of current options in legal education."
Like the hero of the book-then-film, The Paper Chase, Turow got all frazzled—smoking, drinking, making and breaking psychiatric appointments—by his first year at Harvard Law School (1975-76), the year with all the tough courses, heavy pressures, competitive snarls, and think-like-a-lawyer angst. Read full book review >