Search Results: "Edmund Wilson"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 19, 1950

"Make mine Coleridge, upon consideration he is really less old hat than this is."
An equivocal play- both as to form and content- whose admixture of so many disparate elements fails to jell. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 29, 1941

"Shorter appraisals follow — of ssnava, Edith Wharton, Hemingway, James Joyce, and Sophocles' Philo Important for school and college libraries, for public libraries, for study groups."
Edmund Wilson is one of the few consistently competent critics of this time — to many the outstanding. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 11, 1973

"His reputation as the most formidable man of letters of his generation has long been assured."
In Edmund Wilson's last collection of essays and reviews, gathered from The New Yorker and The New York Review of Books, we see that in his declining years he turned more and more to the past, styling himself as a "man of the Twenties," producing nostalgic evocations of childhood loves (his "fetishistic feeling" for Richard Harris Barham's The Ingoldsby Legends), commemorating enthusiasms of his intellectual youth (Mencken and Hemingway and The Waste Land), rescuing unfashonable authors from oblivion (Maurice Baring's books project "the varied conversation, at times almost opalescent, of a very pleasant companion, whom it is always refreshing to listen to, even if one may not always remember exactly what it was he said"), delineating the virtues of turn-of-the-century America through a suitably leisurely study of two neglected social novelists (Henry Fuller and Harold Frederic), and, finally, like the unrepentant anti,academic scholar that he is, castigating with acidulous glee, the phoney-baloney publishing practices of the Modern Language Association. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO THE FINLAND STATION by Edmund Wilson
Released: Sept. 26, 1940

"Wilson is one of the finest liberal critics of our time — and this study though not for the general reader, is important as analysis of the progress of the social world, up to a certain point."
The sub title indicates the scope of this acute and well ordered study of revolution, in theory and in action. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 21, 1968

"MPSLUGDR McGrath' appeared in Commentary, and the second scene of 'Osbert's Career' in the New Republic."
Mr. Wilson's recent closet drama. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILSON'S NIGHT THOUGHTS by Edmund Wilson
Released: Dec. 5, 1961

"For Wilson followers, who are fondly familiar with his writing, this offers some delightful insights."
This is a chronologically arranged collection of prose and poetry (the earliest here, dating from 1917-1919) characterized by spontaneity and wit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 23, 1975

"Still the sort of'literature' that E.W. calls 'the result of our rude collisions with reality' is not here."
Borges says that the element that wears least well in writing issur prise. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 23, 1947

"On Wilson's name, this will get more sober consideration than another reporter might secure."
Things seen and heard by the author-critic, in 1945 travels to London, Rome, Milan, Athens, Delphi, Crete, Naples. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRAVELS IN TWO DEMOCRACIES by Edmund Wilson
Released: May 28, 1936

"Quite entertaining reading and unbalanced as it is — is an interesting revelation of contrasting life."
Twenty years ago a red-headed boy nurtured in the aristocratic Ivy Club walked out of the conservative halls of Princeton and after taking many paths landed in the left wing of Socialism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 1, 1971

"You will find him antipatico which is just where the tattletale quotient of this memoir is heightened; but then, after faulting Van Wyck Brooks for paying too much attention to all the reviews of his books, you will find it depressing to think of Mr. Wilson getting up at four o'clock in the morning to read 'old reviews of my books."
Anouilh once said "When you're forty, half of you belongs to the past — and when you are seventy, nearly all of you." Mr. Wilson's retrospective belongs wholly to that past and, except for the initial section dealing with a still earlier one, it is based on the diaries he kept during the last twenty years which he has converted here into a book — "a last effort to fill a vacuum"? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 3, 1965

"And his analyses of the political machinations of the late Maurice Duplessis and the past censorship tactics of Quebec's clerical hierarchy are pointedly Set against the younger generation's mood of rebellion, exemplified in part by the avant garde work of Marie-Claire Blais and the existentialist concerns of John Buell."
With these notes on certain aspects of Canadian culture, most of which appeared originally in The New Yorker, Edmund Wilson performs like someone taking rabbits out of hats. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1986

"These journals form a permanent and valuable record of Wilson's interests and tastes during the 1950's; they also offer an amusing if informal social and literary history of that era."
Wilson kept extensive journals and diary entries for the entire decade of the 50's and these excerpts—beautifully edited by Edel—offer his trademark blend of crotchetiness and literary acumen. Read full book review >