Search Results: "Edmund Wilson"


BOOK REVIEW

THE TRIPLE THINKERS by Edmund Wilson
Released: March 17, 1938

"His keen analysis of Shaw's shifting about on different stages simplifies our comprehension of this 80-year old paradox, Wilson writes with artistic ease and has the faculty of creating living figures out of writers who have passed into limbo for the average person, but whom he makes still live."
A group of essays that have more than ordinary appeal, and should reach a wider market than the ordinary volume of the kind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 1, 1971

"You will find him antipatico which is just where the tattletale quotient of this memoir is heightened; but then, after faulting Van Wyck Brooks for paying too much attention to all the reviews of his books, you will find it depressing to think of Mr. Wilson getting up at four o'clock in the morning to read 'old reviews of my books."
Anouilh once said "When you're forty, half of you belongs to the past — and when you are seventy, nearly all of you." Mr. Wilson's retrospective belongs wholly to that past and, except for the initial section dealing with a still earlier one, it is based on the diaries he kept during the last twenty years which he has converted here into a book — "a last effort to fill a vacuum"? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

APOLOGIES TO THE IROQUOIS by Edmund Wilson
Released: Jan. 1, 1960

"One feels in conclusion this is one book every American concerned with every aspect of personal liberty should not miss."
Beginning with one of Joseph Mitchell's excellent New Yorker pieces, "Mohawks in High Steel", as introductory material, this is the collection of Edmund Wilson's recent series in the same magazine about the Iroquois Nations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 26, 1962

"No book for hurried reading, this brilliant study will appeal to discerning readers both North and South; it belongs in public and university libraries, and in all comprehensive collections of American literary criticism."
In this long and challenging book Edmund Wilson presents a critical analysis of the works of some 30 men and women, novelists, generals, poets; politicans, diarists, who saw the Civil War at first hand and who wrote of what they saw. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 17, 1977

"Let his curiosity, range, and responsiveness be contagious."
Was he, finally, too various? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHOCK OF RECOGNITION by Edmund Wilson
Released: June 4, 1943

"Stimulating reading, but for students of literature primarily."
An Interesting collection of literary documents, which provides a chronicle of the progress of literature in the United States as recorded by its creators through essays, critical works, memoirs, journals, letters and so on. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 23, 1975

"Still the sort of'literature' that E.W. calls 'the result of our rude collisions with reality' is not here."
Borges says that the element that wears least well in writing issur prise. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILSON'S NIGHT THOUGHTS by Edmund Wilson
Released: Dec. 5, 1961

"For Wilson followers, who are fondly familiar with his writing, this offers some delightful insights."
This is a chronologically arranged collection of prose and poetry (the earliest here, dating from 1917-1919) characterized by spontaneity and wit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1986

"These journals form a permanent and valuable record of Wilson's interests and tastes during the 1950's; they also offer an amusing if informal social and literary history of that era."
Wilson kept extensive journals and diary entries for the entire decade of the 50's and these excerpts—beautifully edited by Edel—offer his trademark blend of crotchetiness and literary acumen. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 21, 1972

"Included in the current miscellany is the famous controversy between Nabokov and Wilson over Evgeni Onegin, which first appeared in The New York Review, and two really splendid chapters on Svetlana and Solzhenitsyn which appeared in The New Yorker."
The glory of the late Edmund Wilson, as Frank Kermode remarked, has always been "his ability to identify, even if he could not completely describe, the master-spirit of an age." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 10, 1950

"But there is no question that, within his limitations, which are highly intellectual in taste and expectations, Wilson is an interesting if demanding critic."
From the New Yorker, the Nation, New Republic and other periodicals, this collects between covers some 67 critical articles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 3, 1965

"And his analyses of the political machinations of the late Maurice Duplessis and the past censorship tactics of Quebec's clerical hierarchy are pointedly Set against the younger generation's mood of rebellion, exemplified in part by the avant garde work of Marie-Claire Blais and the existentialist concerns of John Buell."
With these notes on certain aspects of Canadian culture, most of which appeared originally in The New Yorker, Edmund Wilson performs like someone taking rabbits out of hats. Read full book review >