Search Results: "Edna Coe Bercaw"


BOOK REVIEW

HALMONI’S DAY by Edna Coe Bercaw
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Halmoni captivates her audience, as she will the audience for this stellar debut. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Newcomer Bercaw has written an affecting story of Jennifer's fears and joys when her Korean halmoni, or grandmother, flies from her peaceful village to take part in a school Grandparents' Day program. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOVEY COE by Frances O’Roark Dowell
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2000

"This fabulously feisty heroine will win your heart. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Proud mountainfolk, the Coe family has resided in Indian Creek, North Carolina, since 1844. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CINDER EDNA by Ellen Jackson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1994

"O'Malley's satirical characterizations and lively compositions are right in the spirit of the entertaining story. (Picture book. 5-10)"
One of two new takes on a tale that feminists justly find problematic (see also Minters, below). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY by Frances Schoonmaker
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"By placing the poems into safe, pastel-colored, greeting-card context, she leaves readers with a false portrait of who the poet was. (Poetry. 9-12)"
As a bare introduction to Millay's poetry, this entry in the Poetry for Young People series is adequate, but should not be a substitute for other biographies or analyses of her work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Edna and Luna by Gleah Powers
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 28, 2016

"An appealing story of human resilience and connection with two memorable female protagonists."
Two unconventional women build an uneasy alliance that evolves into family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TYRANNOSAURUS REX VS. EDNA THE VERY FIRST CHICKEN by Douglas Rees
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 26, 2017

"Readers will join the chorus of grateful herbivores in proclaiming that Edna is 'awesome.' (Picture book. 6-8)"
T. rex meets his match. Actually, he never has a chance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"It remains to be seen if these goods will sell in these former colonies. (Photographs—not seen.)"
Lahr (Automatic Vaudeville, 1984, etc.), in British tonalities never learned from his father, offers an overwrought backstage bio of a comedian largely unappreciated this side of the Pond. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TYRELL by Coe Booth
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"While the complex party-planning plotline doesn't exactly cut a straight path, its convoluted-ness undoubtedly illustrates the kinds of obstacles these teens must overcome and the connections they need to make in order to survive—inside or outside the law. (Fiction. YA)"
After his DJ father is incarcerated for drug dealing, 15-year-old Tyrell, his brother and his mother are rendered homeless and move to a slummy city shelter in the Bronx. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOUSE OF SLEEP by Jonathan Coe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1998

"In all: a droll, ingenious novel, its satire nicely leavened by true romance."
An audacious, often wickedly funny meditation on the vexed precincts of sleep and sex, following the adventures of four characters whose wayward paths repeatedly intertwine, by the author of The Winshaw Legacy (1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PROPHETEER by Jason Coe
Released: Sept. 27, 2010

"A wickedly funny send-up."
George W. Bush speaks from the mountaintop—or at least the helicopter pad—in Coe's cutting political satire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KENDRA by Coe Booth
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"The powerful beginning nevertheless signals Booth as a talent to watch. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Kendra, a thoughtful, introspective teen, is more into theatrical design than getting into trouble. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUCH TIMES by Christopher Coe
Released: Aug. 31, 1993

"Timothy has an awful disease, but in the end he's too much of a twit to care about deeply."
A chatty and ultimately brittle second novel (after Coe's I Love Devine, 1987) about a gay man and his two lovers in the age of AIDS. Read full book review >