Search Results: "Edward Skidelsky"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 26, 2012

"Not for libertarians or the Fox News crowd, but the authors deliver powerful, timely material for Wall Street occupiers, public intellectuals, policy wonks and op-ed columnists."
A provocative and articulate discourse on the dismal science and moral philosophy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"A comprehensive and commanding profile that's bidding fair to become the standard reference. (Sixteen pages of b&w illustrations)"
The second installment of Skidelsky's three-volume biography of the 20th century's most influential and controversial economist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 3, 2001

"It's no easy task to write a readable history of the WWII years leaving out all battles and concentrating on how the bill was paid, but Skidelsky succeeds superbly."
Final volume in the definitive biography (following The Economist as Savior, 1920-1937, 1994, etc.) of the brilliant British economist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"One of the most incisive and potentially influential analyses of the implications of the fall of Communism."
A timely and relevant analysis of the post-Communist world that seeks to explain the fall of Communism and, perhaps without intending to do so, drops an intellectual bomb into the budget debate in the US. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEAP HOUSE by Edward Carey
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 2, 2014

"Magnificently creepy. (Horror. 10-16)"
The first in a deliciously macabre trilogy for middle graders and young teens channels Dickens crossed with Lemony Snicket.
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BOOK REVIEW

VERY HAIRY HARRY by Edward Koren
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2003

"Next to fellow cartoonist William Steig's Pete's a Pizza, or, more on topic, Kathleen Krull's Clip, Clip, Clip: Three Stories About Hair, illustrated by Paul Brewer, this comes off as a hesitant, under-plotted effort. (Picture book. 5-7)"
New Yorker cartoonist Koren transfers his trademark hirsute, Bigfoot-like figures to a new format, but then doesn't do much with them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARY ASTOR'S PURPLE DIARY by Edward Sorel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"What was then labeled 'the worst case of dynamite in Hollywood history' seems pretty tame today, but Sorel's command of tone and pen sustains readers' interest."
A charming slice of retro Hollywood tabloid scandal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE by Edward Mapplethorpe
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2016

"A wonderful portfolio of little monsters—or little angels, as you prefer."
A noted photographer turns from his previous interest in abstract portraiture to immediate, evocative studies of infants in their splendid innocence. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

EDWARD JAY EPSTEIN
by Clayton Moore

Getting the attention of investigative journalist Edward Jay Epstein (The JFK Assassination Diary, 2013, etc.) is no small feat. Having profiled everyone from Lee Harvey Oswald to CIA chief James Jesus Angleton, Epstein has had a front row seat to the spy game for more than 40 years. So in May, 2013, when NSA contractor Edward Snowden disclosed mass surveillance ...


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BOOK REVIEW

FOULSHAM by Edward Carey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 7, 2015

"A story wondrous fine, full of terrors and marvels. (Horror. 11 & up)"
The middle volume of the Iremonger trilogy escalates in both suspense and strangeness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I SPY ON THE FARM by Edward Gibbs
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 12, 2013

"A format that engages, entertains and delights—for the third time in a row. Let's hope for more. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Gibbs brings a new guessing game (I Spy with My Little Eye, 2011; I Spy Under the Sea, 2012) to the youngest set. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE ACORN GROWS UP by Edward Gibbs
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 2, 2013

"Unfortunate and inappropriate. (Board book. 3-4)"
Mouse, squirrel, bird, rabbit, boar and deer all wonder what an acorn will become, and it promises to feed and shelter these animals once it is grown. Read full book review >