Search Results: "Edwin Shrake"


BOOK REVIEW

THE BORDERLAND by Edwin Shrake
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 5, 2000

"Still, Shrake moves the plot along with zest. His portrait of a tiny nation, born in struggle, fighting to survive and to invent an identity, is often gripping. An unusual, ambitious work of historical fiction."
A vigorous portrait of the fledgling Texas republic, set in 1839 and involving a large cast of gaudy, outsize characters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 15, 1991

"Well written and lively, but lacking profundity and a skeptical edge."
A slick and none-too-deep look by Diamond (Journalism/N.Y.U.; The Spot, 1984; Sign Off, 1982) at how the media, particularly TV, cover the news. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BILLY BOY by Bud Shrake
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 2, 2001

"Sentimental but never treacly, sweet but not cloying: a sprightly jeu d'esprit, with some solid golfing advice thrown in for good measure."
Texan sportswriter Shrake is probably best known as Harvey Penick's co-author (Harvey Penick's Little Red Book and If You Play Golf You're My Friend, 1993), but he's also written eight novels solo (The Borderland, not reviewed, etc.) before this brief coming-of-age tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 20, 1992

"But Reingold admires where Crichton bashes; as such, essential for all Japan-watchers. (Sixteen pages of photographs—not seen.)"
The former Tokyo Bureau chief of Time magazine, now a senior correspondent, on ``one of the most complex tales of modern twentieth-century history'': the astonishing rise and contradictory nature of postwar Japan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ILLUMINATED FOREST by Edwin Fontanez
Released: April 1, 2014

"If pared down to its essential storyline, this heartfelt tale of a young boy's pain and reluctance to make connections could form an instructive, charming story for younger readers."
In Fontánez's (On this Beautiful Island, 2004, etc.) illustrated novel, Mateo, a troubled young boy reared in Puerto Rico, returns briefly, but eventfully, to his grandparents' small island community. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Diamond manages to capture the varied anxieties and discontents besetting a great newspaper as it tries to keep pace."
Gossipy, albeit exhaustive and substantive, status report on the New York Times from a perceptive observer of major media who teaches journalism at NYU. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MASTER PAINTER by Edwin Mullins
Released: April 18, 1989

Medievalist and art-critic Mullins has published historical novels in England; this fictionalized look st Flemish painter Jan van Eyck is a competent but not very auspicious American debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FORMAT C: by Edwin Black
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 15, 1999

"Others, perhaps, will not, although Black throughout shows great smarts and at times displays virtuoso rhetoric. (First printing of 50,000; $150,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Massively conceived, neatly chiseled computer novel that begins on the wrong foot with lists of consumer goods enjoyed by a sybaritic hero only a Honda Del Sol salesman could love. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WITH REAGAN by Edwin Meese
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1992

"A brisk and engrossing—if decidedly biased—memoir."
Ronald Reagan's friend, confidant, and attorney general offers a lively and absorbing apologia for his old boss and his Administration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIGHT DATA by Edwin S. Rubenstein
NON-FICTION
Released: April 15, 1994

"The text has a foreword by Jack Kemp."
Against the odds, perhaps, this collection of columns by the National Review's house economics analyst and prominent outsiders has considerable impact as a lively, thought-provoking defense of positions near or dear to the hearts and minds of political conservatives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIROHITO by Edwin P. Hoyt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 14, 1992

"Well written, but Hoyt adds little here to our knowledge of Hirohito the man, while his thoughts about Hirohito the emperor amount to an anithistorical polemic."
A provocative but unpersuasive apologia for the Japanese emperor. Read full book review >