Search Results: "Elaine Pagels"


BOOK REVIEW

THE ORIGIN OF SATAN by Elaine Pagels
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"An attractive and scholarly, if not entirely satisfying, presentation of a stimulating thesis."
An NBCC and National Book Awardwinning scholar of Gnosticism and early Christianity argues that the concept of Satan was central to the way apocalyptic Jews and the Christian Church saw—and treated—their enemies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 13, 2003

"A thoughtful and rewarding essay, as we've come to expect from Pagels, and sure to arouse fundamentalist ire."
One person's hagiography is another's heresy, observes biblical scholar Pagels, though that hasn't stopped generations of Christians from trying to reduce the faith to "a single, authorized set of beliefs." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GNOSTIC GOSPELS by Elaine Pagels
Released: Nov. 26, 1979

"Otherwise a clear, reliable, richly documented guide."
A fine thematic introduction to gnosticism, concentrating on the texts discovered at Nag Hammadi (Upper Egypt) in 1945. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 6, 2012

"Scholarly but widely accessible, the book provides a solid introduction to the one book of the New Testament that claims to be divinely inspired."
Multidimensional reading of "the strangest book in the Bible—and the most controversial." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ICE-CREAM CONES FOR SALE! by Elaine Greenstein
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2003

"As delicious as the story. (author's note, bibliography) (Picture book. 4-8)"
As irresistible as its subject, Greenstein's jaunty text and marvelous pictures are also an object lesson in the joys and perils of research. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALWAYS CLIMB HIGHER by Jeff Pagels
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 25, 2014

"Captures the agony and ecstasy of climbing feats but misses opportunities for self-reflection and insight."
A paraplegic recalls his achievements as a disabled athlete and mountain climber. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Shiite' but not 'Sunni'), skimpy source notes (two-thirds from just two books), and an index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
Four months ago, every library in America needed a book for young people on bin Laden; now, this prolific nonfiction author delivers the biography she has spent three years researching. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TERRORISM by Elaine Landau
NONFICTION
Released: June 1, 1992

"Notes; further reading; index (not seen). (Nonfiction. 12+)"
In a simplified, sensational treatment of a complex topic, Landau digests newspaper, magazine, and TV reports to give a strongly biased account of predicted threats to people in this country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NONFICTION
Released: June 1, 1992

"B&w photos; notes; further reading; index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
A fair, well-balanced account of abuses of human rights through covert action by government agencies, presenting stories from Eastern Europe, Central America, the Middle East, and the US, and incorporating just enough historical background for basic understanding, including some international involvement (e.g., US training of Central American torturers and Israeli training of the Iranian Savak). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHADOWS IN THE STARLIGHT by Elaine Cunningham
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"Lean and taut, frank, brutal, sexy: a series well worth grabbing."
Elfpunk/PI noir: second in a fantasy series (Shadows in the Darkness, 2004, not reviewed) wherein exiled elves exist secretly on Earth, mostly despising humans and treating them like toys. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VOICE-OVER by Elaine Equi
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Despite her linguistic pretensions, and her Asiatic posturings, Equi's poems are just small in every way."
The Manhattan—based poet (Decoy, 1994, etc.) reflects the New York School sensibility at its most playful in this ninth volume, full of philosophic nuggets, jokey wordplay, and tiny'sometimes one-word—lines. Read full book review >