Search Results: "Elaine Pascoe"


BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

An entry in The New Explorers books, adapted from the PBS series of the same name. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NONFICTION
Released: Dec. 15, 1992

"List of freedom-defending organizations (including ALA); source notes; bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
Solidly written if uninvolving summary of issues raised in court cases testing the limits of freedom of expression. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TADPOLES by Elaine Pascoe
by Elaine Pascoe, photographed by Dwight Kuhn
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Nevertheless, an especially handsome cover will attract young readers. (glossary, further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 8-10)"
The draw for readers may be information on how to catch, raise, and observe tadpoles from egg to adult, but this solid entry in the Nature Close-Up series also discusses the classification of amphibians, frog families, frog anatomy, life cycle, and endangered status. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOOLED YOU! by Elaine Pascoe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"Still, naïve young readers will find both entertainment and food for thought here. (generous, partly annotated, resource list) (Nonfiction. 9-11)"
From Edgar Allan Poe's bogus newspaper report of a balloon flight across the Atlantic to the heartrending blog of a fictional dying teen, "Kaycee Nicole Swenson," Pascoe reports on over a dozen sensation-creating hoaxes perpetrated over the past two centuries. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEE & ELAINE by Ann Rower
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 19, 2002

"The upshot: She doesn't have much of a story, and neither do we."
Rower's second, as dismal as its predecessor (Armed Response, 1995), trades the former's West Coast trappings for the Hamptons as the artist/writer narrator tries desperately to turn the dead wives of rival painters William de Kooning and Jackson Pollock into posthumous friends—and straighten out her own life in the bargain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 21, 2006

"A testament to the need to be heard, and to the restorative power of friendship."
A lonely wife finds solace in friendship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTER ELAINE by Ann L. Dreyer
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2001

"A likable heroine and a convincing exploration of loss. (Fiction. 10-14)"
A few weeks before the end of Gina's fifth-grade year, her angry, difficult older sister skips school and dies in a car accident with another teenager with whom she had been drinking. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 30, 1993

"Written in pedestrian prose—but nonetheless a continually engrossing, if depressing, portrait of an American master. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
An unvarnished life of ``action painter'' Willem de Kooning and his artist-wife, by Hall (past president of the Rhode Island School of Design; Betty Parsons, 1991—not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AUNT ELAINE DOES THE DANCE FROM SPAIN by Leah Komaiko
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"The story is slight but pleasantly frothy; Mathers, widely praised for her sophisticated colors and clean, imaginative design, breaks no new ground here but nicely captures the lighthearted spirit in her vibrant, delicately witty art. (Picture book. 4-8)"
``Aunt Elaine/thinks she's from Spain,/but she and Dad were born in Maine,'' confides Elaine's slightly nerdy-looking niece, Katy; as ``Elena,'' her aunt is enthusiastic about performing Spanish dances with what looks like a multicultural troupe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1994

"Perhaps only an artist could write about other artists with such genuine curiosity and open-mindedness."
De Kooning (1918-89) was a painter herself, and, in the essays here, she describes art the way artists experience it—the messy, hands-on, tactile experience of painting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUR FATHER WHO ART IN A TREE by Judy Pascoe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 11, 2003

"Although this Australian newcomer can write keenly (a garden hose 'wriggled like a cut snake'), her intent is far too obvious, her details too vague. The result reads more like an extended metaphor than a novel."
A not-so-subtle exploration of a family's grief—as a young girl believes that her recently deceased father speaks to her from the branches of the poinciana tree in the backyard. Read full book review >