Search Results: "Elaine Szewczyk"


BOOK REVIEW

I’M WITH STUPID by Elaine Szewczyk
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 24, 2008

"Often laugh-out-loud funny, Kirkus editor Szewczyk's well-observed debut is a quirky, perverse take on dating that easily rises above the singleton genre competition."
A magical one-night stand with a strapping South African wildlife ranger has unexpected consequences in this screwball rom-com with a winningly sardonic heroine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEE & ELAINE by Ann Rower
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 19, 2002

"The upshot: She doesn't have much of a story, and neither do we."
Rower's second, as dismal as its predecessor (Armed Response, 1995), trades the former's West Coast trappings for the Hamptons as the artist/writer narrator tries desperately to turn the dead wives of rival painters William de Kooning and Jackson Pollock into posthumous friends—and straighten out her own life in the bargain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 21, 2006

"A testament to the need to be heard, and to the restorative power of friendship."
A lonely wife finds solace in friendship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTER ELAINE by Ann L. Dreyer
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2001

"A likable heroine and a convincing exploration of loss. (Fiction. 10-14)"
A few weeks before the end of Gina's fifth-grade year, her angry, difficult older sister skips school and dies in a car accident with another teenager with whom she had been drinking. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 30, 1993

"Written in pedestrian prose—but nonetheless a continually engrossing, if depressing, portrait of an American master. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
An unvarnished life of ``action painter'' Willem de Kooning and his artist-wife, by Hall (past president of the Rhode Island School of Design; Betty Parsons, 1991—not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AUNT ELAINE DOES THE DANCE FROM SPAIN by Leah Komaiko
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"The story is slight but pleasantly frothy; Mathers, widely praised for her sophisticated colors and clean, imaginative design, breaks no new ground here but nicely captures the lighthearted spirit in her vibrant, delicately witty art. (Picture book. 4-8)"
``Aunt Elaine/thinks she's from Spain,/but she and Dad were born in Maine,'' confides Elaine's slightly nerdy-looking niece, Katy; as ``Elena,'' her aunt is enthusiastic about performing Spanish dances with what looks like a multicultural troupe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1994

"Perhaps only an artist could write about other artists with such genuine curiosity and open-mindedness."
De Kooning (1918-89) was a painter herself, and, in the essays here, she describes art the way artists experience it—the messy, hands-on, tactile experience of painting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ICE-CREAM CONES FOR SALE! by Elaine Greenstein
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2003

"As delicious as the story. (author's note, bibliography) (Picture book. 4-8)"
As irresistible as its subject, Greenstein's jaunty text and marvelous pictures are also an object lesson in the joys and perils of research. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN IS A PLANET NOT A PLANET? by Elaine Scott
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 20, 2007

Joining the rush of revised views of the solar system for young readers that has been following in the wake of the International Astronomical Union's decision to redefine Pluto (and some other fellow wanderers) as "dwarf planets" rather than the full-fledged sort, this production shows several signs of haste, from a narrative that fails to note that Pluto has more than one moon to a chapter that opens with a full page, uncaptioned photo of a vague smear of light. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MRS. ROSE'S GARDEN by Elaine Greenstein
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1996

"(Picture book. 3-6)"
Mrs. Rose's Garden ($15.00; May 1, 1996; 32 pp.; 0-689-80215-3): A gentle tale of homegrown generosity. Mrs. Rose has always wanted to win blue ribbons, until her unusual mix of fertilizers produces a whole garden full of prize-winning vegetables. ``Somehow it didn't feel like fun anymore,'' so Mrs. Rose hits on a plan to neatly redistribute the bounty and turn all her neighbors into winners, too. Mrs. Rose gets a special ribbon from Mr. Rose for having ``the biggest heart''—a nice touch in a winning and warming story accompanied by paintings that have a flattened perspective and a sweet, quirky magic. Read full book review >