Search Results: "Elana Maryles Sztokman"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"Overall, a worthwhile and eye-opening study."
An exploration of radical Judaism's treatment of women in Israel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DELHI DECEPTION by Elana Sabharwal
Released: Jan. 28, 2013

"A swift pace will keep readers hooked as the timely, intriguing plot unravels."
In Sabharwal's debut romantic thriller, a 30-something South African journalist travels to Delhi, falls for a mysterious charmer and inadvertently becomes a pawn in a secret mission to uncover a sinister underworld of human trafficking and international crime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POSSESSION by Elana Johnson
FICTION
Released: June 7, 2011

"Moral subtlety loses out to breathless pacing; the ending is derivative of Scott Westerfeld's superior Uglies (2005). (Science fiction. 14 & up)"
This debut dystopia succeeds at suspense and tension but fails at moral complexity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Case Two: Big Bully Holly Howler by Elana Ashley
Released: Nov. 19, 2015

"Young readers should sympathize with the compassionate heroine, and perhaps start to feel empathy for others."
An alien detective and his elephant friends return in this second issue-based adventure for grade schoolers, filled with brightly colored photographs of puppet characters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SACRED by Elana K. Arnold
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Nov. 13, 2012

"Schlock. (Paranormal romance. 13-16)"
Scarlett's peaceful life on Catalina Island bifurcated last spring into the time Before Ronny Died and her miserable present. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT GIRLS ARE MADE OF by Elana K. Arnold
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 1, 2017

"Unflinchingly candid, unapologetically girl, and devastatingly vital. (author's note) (Fiction. 13-17)"
Pulling back the curtain on the wizard of social expectations, Arnold (Infandous, 2015, etc.) explores the real, knotted, messy, thriving heartbeat of young womanhood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE LAND OF ARMADILLOS by Helen Maryles Shankman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A deeply humane demonstration of wringing art from catastrophe."
A portrait of the small Polish town of Wlodawa during World War II, this collection of linked short stories is both moving and unsettling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BURNING by Elana K. Arnold
YOUNG ADULT
Released: June 11, 2013

"Lyrical and inspirational, though Lala's inexplicably outsider view of her own culture, complete with sneers at harmless cultural practices, is a deeply jarring note. (Fiction. 14-17)"
A white boy afraid to leave his family meets a Romani girl who wants a brief romantic encounter in the Nevada desert. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BOY CALLED BAT by Elana K. Arnold
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 14, 2017

"Comfortably familiar and quietly groundbreaking, this introduction to Bat should charm readers, who will likely look forward to more opportunities to explore life from Bat's particular point of view. (Fiction. 7-10)"
A third-grader becomes fascinated with an orphaned skunk kit and wages a campaign to convince his veterinarian mom that their family should care for the animal until it can be released to the wild. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1999

"Hass graces Gaza with revolutionary fire, but ultimately, her book only proves that nothing positive is built on rage."
Remarkable but vehemently Marxist reportage from an Israeli journalist who adopts Gaza as her home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 1, 2005

"Though the text has some amateurish didacticism, this cheerful piece has charm. (4-8)"
Simple, appealing photographs of puppets in a house illustrate this homespun tale about a lost bracelet and a fight between friends. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

LIKING THE UNLIKABLE
by Leila Roy

I know it’s not cool to define yourself by a boy. Girls are supposed to be independent, these days. We should be Strong Female Characters, we should be tough and self-motivated and grrrrrls instead of girls. We’re supposed to run the world—girls—and look unapologetically into the camera. We don’t have to smile. We can cross our arms or curl our ...
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