Search Results: "Eleanora E. Tate"


BOOK REVIEW

CELESTE’S HARLEM RENAISSANCE by Eleanora E. Tate
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2007

"Absorbing. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Celeste's father has tuberculosis and must go into a sanatorium. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BLESSING IN DISGUISE by Eleanora E. Tate
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

The final novel in Tate's trilogy set in Calvary County, South Carolina, this is the story of Zambia Brown, a 12-year-old African- American girl struggling with her place in the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRONT PORCH STORIES AT THE ONE-ROOM SCHOOL by Eleanora E. Tate
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 10-13)"
Some of the lively characters in Just an Overnight Guest (1980) return in this celebration of storytelling and small-town life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The result is not seamless when read in one sitting, but the author maintains a storyteller's pace and penchant for exaggeration until the tales humorously blur the lines between what is fable and what is true. (b&w illustrations, notes, not seen) (Short stories. 8-12)"
Tate (Front Porch Stories at the One Room School, 1992, etc.) celebrates African-American storytelling and small-town life in a collection of seven funny, folksy tales spun around proverbs, e.g., ``Big Things Come in Small Packages,'' and ``Slow and Steady Wins the Race.'' Exaggerated characters—ranging from a fish-finding basset hound and Bron Kitis, the Hand Fish King of Nutbrush County, Missouri, to Taneshia and Sudsey in their high-flying search for a boyfriend—have a folkloric, larger-than-life appeal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E by Matt Beaumont
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Your career may depend on it."
Subject: Fab debut of former London adman, making a bugger-all brilliant update on the epistolary novel by having it largely in e-mail thrashing about on the office network and focusing on London's Miller Shanks ad agency striving to land the Coke account. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHARON TATE by Ed Sanders
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Readers are likely to finish the book more confused than illuminated by all the possibilities, theories, and potential co-conspirators."
The author revisits the murder that spawned his best-known book, The Family (1971).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STE-E-E-E-EAMBOAT A-COMIN’! by Jill Esbaum
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 8, 2005

"The Story of Captain Blanche Leathers (2000), illus by Holly Meade, though its content is closer to William Anderson's comparatively restrained River Boy (2003), illus by Dan Andreasen. (afterword, map) (Picture book. 7-9)"
Inspired by a passage from Mark Twain's Life on the Mississippi, Esbaum captures the bustle and commotion attending a steam packet's arrival in a small river town: "Rubberneckers, / pounding boots, / whiskered geezers, big galoots. / Wheels a-clatter, / choking cloud, / yapping dog, excited crowd." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE LIES DANIEL TATE by Cristin Terrill
YOUNG ADULT
Released: June 6, 2017

"A mystery thriller that falls short of thrilling. (Thriller. 14-18)"
A teenage con artist finds himself in too deep when he impersonates a missing boy from a rich family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLAIMING GEORGIA TATE by Gigi Amateau
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: June 1, 2005

"However, the ending is marred by her implausibly quick emotional recovery from the incest, and, equally implausible, the implication that her father will be easily made to forfeit custody of her and even be imprisoned for the abuse. (Fiction. 13+)"
Although this debut shows promise in its engaging narrative voice, too many tragedies and unusual characters, including a transvestite and a generous ex-con, overwhelm the plot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EVOLUTION OF CALPURNIA TATE by Jacqueline Kelly
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2009

"Readers will finish this witty, deftly crafted debut novel rooting for 'Callie Vee' and wishing they knew what kind of adult she would become. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
"Mother was awakening to the sorry facts: My biscuits were like stones, my samplers askew, my seams like rickrack." Read full book review >