Search Results: "Elizabeth Anne Fenn"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"An excellent study that complicates the heroic portrayal of the Revolution."
A pox-centric history of the American Revolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 11, 2014

"An excellent contribution to the truth telling of the American Indian story."
A nonpolemical, engaging study of a once-thriving Indian nation of the American heartland whose origins and demise tell us much about ourselves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2004

"Notes from Krull on keeping a diary, from Anne Elizabeth's granddaughter, and a summary of the rest of her life (she did become an artist, and she did make a living at it) are a bonus. (notes, index) (Nonfiction. 9-14)"
A marvelous confluence of text and image, history and research, family and locale makes this a deeply appealing title. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOGS ON THE BED by Elizabeth Bluemle
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"Anyone who lets their dogs sleep on the bed will find this tale doggone funny. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A cheery family with two young children and six dogs of varying breeds and sizes tries to bed down for the night in this comical story about cuddling up with canine companions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

"Occasionally a drag, and Moore could have provided more examples, but this is a work of honesty and, yes, integrity."
An indie journalist and activist rummages around in the messy subjects of integrity and selling out, and asks how to clearly define one or the other. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLIGHT RISK by Jennifer Fenn
YOUNG ADULT
Released: July 18, 2017

"Too much time on the tarmac, not enough time in the air. (Fiction. 12-18)"
A teenage boy with attention issues tries to escape his small town in Washington by stealing and crashing small planes from local airfields. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POWERS THAT BE by Anne McCaffrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1993

"A felicitous combination of authors, rather better indeed than either contributor's recent solo efforts."
Well-handled far-future speculation on ecological engineering and planetary consciousness, from McCaffrey (Damia's Children, etc.) and Scarborough (Last Refuge). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ACORNA’S REBELS by Anne McCaffrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"Ho-hum dialogue and shoddy world-building will turn off all but series fans (who will thrill to former McCaffery collaborator Margaret Ball's tedious appendix about the fake language the characters speak) and cat-fantasy readers, who will adore the cloyingly cute passages about heroic felines."
Alert for SF cat lovers: Acorna, the telepathic teen with the unicorn's horn, rescues a planet of felines and warring humans, both menaced by a plague. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POWER PLAY by Anne McCaffrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1995

"A more playful entry than hitherto, but just as gratifying and engaging."
Third of a trilogy (Power Lines, 1994; Powers That Be, 1993) about the sentient planet Petaybee, its rugged but tuned-in, sharing-caring inhabitants, and the disbelieving or indifferent outsiders who wish to grab the planet's mineral wealth, hunt its abundant wildlife, or exploit its plants for new drugs and medicines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ACORNA’S WORLD by Anne McCaffrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Cute and fluffy, not even remotely tense or gripping: a by-the-numbers, bash-the-nasty-aliens romp, breezy enough for uncritical fans of this popular duo (Power Play, 1995, etc.)."
McCaffrey continues the series (note the new collaborator: Acorna, 1997, was with Margaret Ball) about the telepathic human-alien unicorn, Acorna, a Linyaari whose horn can purify water and air and heal injuries. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 27, 2005

"A waste of time for any audience other than young adults."
First in a trilogy spun off from previous books about the sentient planet Petaybee (Power Lines, 1994, etc.), following the adventures of a pair of adorably inquisitive twins. Read full book review >