Search Results: "Elizabeth Enright"


BOOK REVIEW

THE SATURDAYS by Elizabeth Enright
Released: Oct. 9, 1941

"And each one is a personality in his or her right."
A delightful family story, built around an original pattern. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 7, 1959

"Literate and likable."
16 short stories (with a dividend in the title piece which improvises three variations on a curious Latin phrase) again display this author's qualities of grace and imagination, ability to pinpoint incidents sharply and to hold a mood or feeling firmly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIMBLE SUMMER by Elizabeth Enright
Released: Aug. 18, 1928

I liked this story of the events through the summer months on a Wisconsin farm, events with enough element of surprise and adventure and yet sound in content and with a good deal about the round of activities, — barn raising, threshing, etc. The title comes from the feeling on the part of the small heroine that her finding of the thimble had brought luck to the farm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by Lisa Hilton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"Mildly revisionist, well-argued, and thoroughly satisfying."
There is no shortage of biographies of Britain's Elizabeth I (1533-1603), but readers should pay attention to this thoughtful, often ingenious account. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by Sarah Bradford
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 16, 1996

"No tabloid hype here, but this authoritative biography has enough revealing nuggets scattered through an otherwise flat narrative to keep a royal watcher enthralled. (17 color and 39 b&w photos) (Author tour)"
In the year of her 70th birthday, Elizabeth II of England comes under scrutiny as mother (not quite good enough), wife (better), and constitutional monarch (outstanding). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by John Guy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"One of the best biographies of Elizabeth ever."
The Whitbread Award-winning author delivers an outstanding biography of Queen Elizabeth (1533-1603). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 21, 2012

"Moloney says she found her voice through writing her memoir; readers, however, may not be able to follow what she's saying."
Ex-nun Moloney's debut memoir chronicles a life bound by the expectations of others, turned around with the help of Alcoholics Anonymous, Jungian analysis and New Age spirituality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by J. Randy Taraborrelli
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 29, 2006

"Overly worshipful, but you'd have to be quite jaded to be bored by this chronicle of a miniseries life."
Veteran diva-disher Taraborrelli, who has written about Cher, Madonna and Princess Grace, turns his pen on the silver screen starlet of the century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by David Starkey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 2, 2000

"Reveals a livelier Liz: lovely, clever, wise, and—like all the other Tudors—possessed of the 'besetting sin' of 'rapacity.' (16 pp. color photos and illustrations)"
In brisk, bracing prose, a freelance historian follows England's first Queen Elizabeth from birth to the early days of her reign. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KINTU by Elizabeth Enright
Released: Oct. 1, 1935

"Text and pictures by the author combine delightfully."
A read-aloud book for the six, seven and eight year old; or a book that the youngster just graduating from primers will find good entertainment and simple enough in vocabulary for his abilities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 26, 1955

"A selective audience here."
Some dozen and a half short stories commune with old age, youth, the "color of truth" and some "fierce small rebellions", and confront the reader with an unwinking observance of characters within their own limits, or a situation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 15, 1946

"But one questions whether these are sufficiently distinguished or distinctive to override the lack of general popularity of the genus short stories in book form."
Net the quality in writing of say New Yorker level, but in theme and tenor, distinctly superior to the run-of-the-mill ladies' magazines (though a few of them appeared in Cosmo and Good Housekeeping). Read full book review >