Search Results: "Elizabeth Gaffney"


BOOK REVIEW

YOU CAN'T SEE THE ELEPHANTS by Susan Kreller
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"Disturbingly plausible, definitely thought- and discussion-provoking. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Seeing evidence that a neighbor's children are being abused, a young teenager looks for adult help and finds none in this disquieting German import. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INVISIBLE WOMAN by Ika Hügel-Marshall
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 2000

"A searing indictment of racism and institutional violence by a survivor."
An impassioned memoir of growing up black (or, strictly speaking, mulatto) in postwar Germany that is more a lyrical record of hurts endured and hard lessons learned than a factual accounting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

METROPOLIS by Elizabeth Gaffney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 8, 2005

"Luther alone is worth the price of admission, but there's much more to like in Gaffney's rip-roaring, agreeably ungainly, outrageously entertaining tale."
Dark criminous deeds abound in Paris Review editor Gaffney's colorful debut, a melodrama set in the late 1860s in New York City's notorious Five Points. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN THE WORLD WAS YOUNG by Elizabeth Gaffney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 29, 2014

"A smart coming-of-age tale that upends a raft of Greatest Generation clichés."
A 9-year-old Brooklyn Heights girl picks up some hard lessons about fidelity, race and family after World War II in this lively sophomore effort from Gaffney (Metropolis, 2005). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ARBOGAST CASE by Thomas Hettche
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2003

"Nothing innovative here, but Hettche manipulates the genre's conventions, and the reader's pulse rate, with enviable skill."
A possible miscarriage of justice drives the busy plot of this complex legal thriller, the first English-translated work of a popular German author. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAD DASH by Patricia Gaffney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 7, 2007

"Like its characters, risk averse."
Two bourgeois bohemians shake up their tepid marriage, achieving only stasis in Gaffney's (The Goodbye Summer, 2004, etc.) innocuous latest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAD DASH by Patricia Gaffney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 7, 2007

"Like its characters, risk averse."
Two bourgeois bohemians shake up their tepid marriage, achieving only stasis in Gaffney's (The Goodbye Summer, 2004, etc.) innocuous latest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CIRCLE OF THREE by Patricia Gaffney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"A disappointing second outing marked by a thin story and thinner characters."
A conventional take on the well-worn theme of the relationship between mothers and daughters, this time exploring the effects on lives when a husband and father dies suddenly and three generations find the past still shaping their lives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLIGHT LESSONS by Patricia Gaffney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 23, 2002

"Perceptive, though insights aren't enough to help the thin plot rise very far."
In her third hardcover outing, Gaffney struggles to tackle the unforgiving claims of family as an estranged young woman reluctantly moves back home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WEE AND THE WRIGHT BROTHERS by Timothy R. Gaffney
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"For a fun take-off on aviation history, pair this imaginative blend of historical fact and animal fiction with Pamela Duncan Edwards and Henry Cole's The Wright Brothers (2003), where mice are comic observers of the event. (Picture book. 5-8)"
It's wonderful to be a mouse in 1903, thinks Wee, who lives with his wife and two mousekins in a bicycle shop in Dayton, Ohio, where they publish Mouse News for the mouse neighborhood: Wee writes the stories, Mama runs the printing press, and the youngsters sell the papers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRANDPA TAKES ME TO THE MOON by Timothy R. Gaffney
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Most readers will appreciate the romance of the lunar landing; adults will have a renewed feeling of affection for those exciting days. (Picture book. 4+)"
The narrator, a boy (or a short-haired girl), listens to his astronaut-grandfather's bedtime story about his trip to the moon and imagines himself along for the ride. Read full book review >