Search Results: "Elizabeth Kerner"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LESSER KINDRED by Elizabeth Kerner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2000

"For the rest, a so-so installment at best, and you'll have to wait for volume three—at least—to discover how it all comes out."
Sequel to Song in the Silence (1997), Scotland-resident Kerner's fantasy about a clash between wise old dragons and evil sorcerers allied with demons. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SONG IN THE SILENCE by Elizabeth Kerner
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Expect sequels."
In Kolmar, tall young horse-farmer Lanen Kaelar dreams of meeting the True Dragons of the remote West. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REDEEMING THE LOST by Elizabeth Kerner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2004

"A rousing, inventive, action-packed conclusion—once you come to terms with the confusing and absurd multiple first-person narrators."
Wrapping up Kerner's fantasy trilogy (The Lesser Kindred, 2000, etc.) about a struggle pitting white-hat Gedri (humans) and Kantri (dragons) against black-hat wizards and demons from the Six Hells. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by Lisa Hilton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"Mildly revisionist, well-argued, and thoroughly satisfying."
There is no shortage of biographies of Britain's Elizabeth I (1533-1603), but readers should pay attention to this thoughtful, often ingenious account. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by Sarah Bradford
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 16, 1996

"No tabloid hype here, but this authoritative biography has enough revealing nuggets scattered through an otherwise flat narrative to keep a royal watcher enthralled. (17 color and 39 b&w photos) (Author tour)"
In the year of her 70th birthday, Elizabeth II of England comes under scrutiny as mother (not quite good enough), wife (better), and constitutional monarch (outstanding). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by David Starkey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 2, 2000

"Reveals a livelier Liz: lovely, clever, wise, and—like all the other Tudors—possessed of the 'besetting sin' of 'rapacity.' (16 pp. color photos and illustrations)"
In brisk, bracing prose, a freelance historian follows England's first Queen Elizabeth from birth to the early days of her reign. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by John Guy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"One of the best biographies of Elizabeth ever."
The Whitbread Award-winning author delivers an outstanding biography of Queen Elizabeth (1533-1603). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 21, 2012

"Moloney says she found her voice through writing her memoir; readers, however, may not be able to follow what she's saying."
Ex-nun Moloney's debut memoir chronicles a life bound by the expectations of others, turned around with the help of Alcoholics Anonymous, Jungian analysis and New Age spirituality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by J. Randy Taraborrelli
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 29, 2006

"Overly worshipful, but you'd have to be quite jaded to be bored by this chronicle of a miniseries life."
Veteran diva-disher Taraborrelli, who has written about Cher, Madonna and Princess Grace, turns his pen on the silver screen starlet of the century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUEPRINT by Charlotte Kerner
FICTION
Released: Oct. 17, 2000

"Disturbing and unsettling, this is less a translation of a particular culture than a human face on a question that is intriguing worldwide. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Siri is the daughter/twin of Iris and one of the first cloned beings in this seamless translation of German author Kerner's exploration of the psychological reality for cloned humans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH I by Margaret George
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 5, 2011

"Historically sound, but without the sympathetic spark of the best historical fiction."
Overly busy novel of life inside the Virgin Queen's court—and mind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"But there's a muddiness here—Bishop is revealed but then covered up again without psychological or literary acuity—that can't quite convince us that Bishop's life or her art matters as much as these pages assume that it does."
Nappy with the sympathy, solicitude, and slightly off-kilter admiration that the fans of Elizabeth Bishop (1911-79) are known for, Millier (American Literature/Middlebury College) delivers a long, detailed life of the woman who wrote contemporary American poetry everyone seemed to respect without ever being able to say quite why. Read full book review >