Search Results: "Elizabeth Peters"


BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by Lisa Hilton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"Mildly revisionist, well-argued, and thoroughly satisfying."
There is no shortage of biographies of Britain's Elizabeth I (1533-1603), but readers should pay attention to this thoughtful, often ingenious account. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by David Starkey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 2, 2000

"Reveals a livelier Liz: lovely, clever, wise, and—like all the other Tudors—possessed of the 'besetting sin' of 'rapacity.' (16 pp. color photos and illustrations)"
In brisk, bracing prose, a freelance historian follows England's first Queen Elizabeth from birth to the early days of her reign. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by Sarah Bradford
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 16, 1996

"No tabloid hype here, but this authoritative biography has enough revealing nuggets scattered through an otherwise flat narrative to keep a royal watcher enthralled. (17 color and 39 b&w photos) (Author tour)"
In the year of her 70th birthday, Elizabeth II of England comes under scrutiny as mother (not quite good enough), wife (better), and constitutional monarch (outstanding). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by John Guy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"One of the best biographies of Elizabeth ever."
The Whitbread Award-winning author delivers an outstanding biography of Queen Elizabeth (1533-1603). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 21, 2012

"Moloney says she found her voice through writing her memoir; readers, however, may not be able to follow what she's saying."
Ex-nun Moloney's debut memoir chronicles a life bound by the expectations of others, turned around with the help of Alcoholics Anonymous, Jungian analysis and New Age spirituality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by J. Randy Taraborrelli
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 29, 2006

"Overly worshipful, but you'd have to be quite jaded to be bored by this chronicle of a miniseries life."
Veteran diva-disher Taraborrelli, who has written about Cher, Madonna and Princess Grace, turns his pen on the silver screen starlet of the century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BORROWER OF THE NIGHT by Elizabeth Peters
Released: April 30, 1973

"More picturesque than frightening for this writer's young adult or old adult ongoing readership."
Independent, Liberated — she claims, Vicky and two young co-historians all end up at a castle near Rothenburg looking for a famous jeweled shrine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEVENTH SINNER by Elizabeth Peters
Released: April 1, 1972

"It's for the girls — young or as old as those Seven Hills."
In Rome (Miss Peters writes packaged tour mysteries — this is better than her last) seven young people pursuing archaeology and known as the seven sinners become six when slightly odd Albert dies articulating the word or rather number seven. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAMELOT CAPER by Elizabeth Peters
Released: March 1, 1969

"Alas a lack of sense or much else for that other mature audience."
A not so brief shining moment, a return to Camelot serialized with an extended tour of the British cathedrals and a catch-as-catch can pursuit beginning when Jessica drops an antique ring she is returning to her grandfather in the collection bag at Salisbury. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAUGHTER OF DEAD KINGS by Elizabeth Peters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 19, 2008

"An over-the-top adventure yarn whose potent brew of mystery and romance should make it another hit among the Peters (Tomb of the Golden Bird, 2006, etc.) faithful."
Munich-based art historian and amateur sleuth Vicky Bliss (Night Train to Memphis, 1994, etc.) returns after a long hiatus to answer the burning question: Who would dare steal the mummy of King Tut? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOMB OF THE GOLDEN BIRD by Elizabeth Peters
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 2006

"The political machinations are less interesting than the competition between the archaeologists and the Emerson family. As usual, though, Peters (The Serpent on the Crown, 2005, etc.) has great fun dressing her characters up in Victorian finery and outpost-of-the-empire attitudes."
By 1922, almost every Egyptologist despairs of finding another royal tomb—except for Radcliffe Emerson, who doesn't have the rights to dig where he suspects Tutankhamen lies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SERPENT ON THE CROWN by Elizabeth Peters
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 2005

"Peabody's Victorian rhetoric can go over the top, but her likable family's fans will find much to enjoy in an adventure less convoluted than usual (The Falcon at the Portal, 1999, etc.), salted with the obligatory tidbits of Egyptology."
More murder and mayhem for the indefatigable Amelia Peabody and her friends and relations. Read full book review >