Search Results: "Ellen Potter"


BOOK REVIEW

THE HUMMING ROOM by Ellen Potter
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 2012

"An homage to a cherished classic that can work as a companion piece or stand alone as a solid, modern tale for young readers in the 21st century. (Fiction. 9-12)"
A young orphan finds herself in a remote mansion that hides many secrets. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLOB by Ellen Potter
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2009

"While some readers may balk at some of its more convenient coincidences, fans of Jerry Spinelli and others of his ilk may especially enjoy it and will be held rapt. (Mystery. 9-12)"
An intriguingly offbeat mystery concerning the theft of cookies from a boy's lunch, at turns humorous, suspenseful and poignant. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEATRIX POTTER by John Malam
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 3, 1998

"With full-color and black-and-white illustrations. (chronology, glossary, index) (Biography. 5-8)"
Beatrix Potter (24 pp.; $19.93; Nov. 3; 1-57505-275-X): A charming biography in the Tell Me About series, about Peter Rabbit's creator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELLEN TEBBITS by Louis Darling
FICTION
Released: Sept. 5, 1951

"An eraser clapping session, however, patches the quarrel."
It seems obvious from this entrancing successor to Henry Huggins that the author is as well acquainted with the whisperings, weeps and whoops of third grade distaff side as she is with the ways of young men like Henry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KNEEBONE BOY by Ellen Potter
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 14, 2010

"A quirky charmer. (Fiction. 11 & up)"
The Hardscrabbles of the English town of Little Tunks—silent Otto, the adventure-seeking Lucia and whip-smart Max—have become accustomed to their shy, rumpled father's absences since their mother's suspicious disappearance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PISH POSH by Ellen Potter
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2006

"This disconcerting turn in storytelling weakens the first fascination with the characters, as they flatten and disintegrate when lives and story are tidied up to accommodate a too-easy ending. (Fiction. 9-11)"
Monsieur Frankofile's upscale restaurant, Pish Posh, has a gimmick: his daughter, Clara (11), who heartlessly polices the success or failure of each diner, determining who can have a reservation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. POTTER by Jamaica Kincaid
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"Disappointingly, too labored and self-conscious to achieve its ends."
An ambitious but often sententious attempt to link the story of a tropical island Everyman to great events of the era. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CINDY ELLEN by Susan Lowell
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 31, 2000

"Bright, stylish, and with a boosterish concluding note on women in rodeo. (Picture book/fairy tale. 7-9)"
From the author of The Bootmaker and the Elves (1997), another ripsnortin' Western take on a traditional fairy tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEATRIX POTTER by Linda Lear
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 9, 2007

"Although Lear had access to volumes of diaries and letters, her shaping of Potter's intriguing life is rather blockheaded."
A stolid biography by environmental historian Lear (Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature, 1997) that gets at the facts of Victorian Potter's life but does not bother addressing motivations and thwarted ambition. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEATRIX POTTER by Alexandra Wallner
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"Several children's biographies of Potter are in print; it's good to have one for this audience. (Picture book/biography. 6-9)"
Wallner (Betsy Ross, 1994) has written a beginning biography of a woman as familiar to children as Mother Goose, but whose life is much easier to track. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BECOMING ELLEN by Shari Shattuck
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"A tale of kindhearted, hesitant heroism, with a little vigilante justice."
Ellen and her blind best friend, Temerity, again take on the wrongs of this world, letting neither emotional scarring nor physical disability stand in their way. Read full book review >