Search Results: "Ellen Raskin"


BOOK REVIEW

NOTHING EVER HAPPENS ON MY BLOCK by Ellen Raskin
Released: March 22, 1966

"The pictorial counterpoint to Chester's claim to dissatisfaction offers hours of diversion to children who will find themselves picking out first the obvious then the many minute details, each a complex narrative in itself, as well as a graphic illustration of the sort of atmosphere that can turn a little boy into an unnoticing nobody."
Chester Filbert is the obverse of the little boy who saw it all on Mulberry Street. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOE Q. MCGLUTCH, HE SMOKED TOO MUCH by Ellen Raskin
Released: Sept. 15, 1973

"It's fun to read the pictures for details the words don't tell, but it's sometimes hard to see the smoke signals for all of Raskin's brilliant visual patterns."
Instead of dressing up an anti-smoking message in comic clothing, Ellen Raskin outdoes the Victorian spoof, using Moe's dangerous habit as an occasion for pure farce — and for parading her stylishly flamboyant menagerie. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TWENTY-TWO, TWENTY-THREE by Ellen Raskin
Released: Aug. 18, 1976

"In our view, it's a head trip that will attract few passengers."
Unquestionably, Ellen Raskin is a genuine kook. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TATTOOED POTATO AND OTHER CLUES by Ellen Raskin
Released: April 28, 1975

"Strangely enough, simply by piling and tangling up ali the name games and disguises that seem at first just mechanically ludicrous, Raskin wears down your resistance, so that by the time everyone is happily united in jail you'll be laughing as inarticulately as the brain-damaged, one-eyed, deaf-mute, Isaac Bickerstaffe (formerly Frederick Schmaltz)."
"Timothy Hay sounds like a fake name," remarks the heroine—oddly, since hers is Dickory Dock, her brother is Donald Dock, and others who make their appearance at and around the Greenwich Village row house where she works include rich collector Julius Panzpresser, fellow art student George Washington III, underworld lackey Shrimps Marinara, elusive artist Roy G. Bliv (to be found not in Who's Who but in the spectrum), three Eldon F. Zyzyskczuks (an exporter on 743 East 84th St., an importer on 734 West 84th St., and a forger who takes advantage of the mix-up in their credit cards—actually, all three are one and the same), and four detectives named Winkle (the blind man), Dinkel (the derelict), Finkel (the exterminator) and Hinkle (the hippy). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIGGS & PHANTOMS by Ellen Raskin
Released: April 1, 1974

"Still a juvenile novel — however unstrung — that takes such farcical liberties with death, grief and readers' expectations is rare enough to rate a hearing, and the Figgs — all mask and gesture though they are — do come up with a few show-stopping lines."
Except for her beloved Uncle Florence Italy Figg, a 4'6" mail order book dealer who with his niece forms the Figg-Newton monster (a stunt that enables them to reach the rare and unusual books on Ebenezer Bargain's top shelf), Mona Lisa Newton has no use for her kooky relatives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WESTING GAME by Ellen Raskin
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1978

"Confoundingly clever, and very funny."
A supersharp mystery, more a puzzle than a novel, but endowed with a vivid and extensive cast. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRANKLIN STEIN by Ellen Raskin
Released: March 18, 1972

"Moral support for the lonely genius, and — being Raskin — it's ORIGINAL, CREATIVE and ARTISTIC."
Like his once-removed namesake, Franklin Stein labors alone in a creaky old house and brings forth a monster — this one named Fred and made of a mop, potato masher, necktie, skateboard, slats, fan, lamp, rake, feathers, etc. Franklin's family and neighbors and some wildly assorted passersby label Fred "WICKED ABOMINABLE DUMB SINISTER ATROCIOUS WEIRD REVOLTING" — until he wins the pet show blue ribbon and the judge's citation: "ORIGINAL CREATIVE ARTISTIC SUPERB." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1974

"Demonstrating not only the satisfaction of having a home, a mother, and an identity and the importance of words in providing the last of the three, but proving also Raskin's ability (less evident in Who Said Sue and Moe Q. McGlutch) to inform her silly situations and crisp, witty pictures with some unobtrusive psychological substance."
One day a big wind blew. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 8, 1970

"That smile is almost worth the discomfort of being peppered with boldface letters (sometimes in signs like EAT) and exposed to a history lesson—though we were glad to see one scholar snoozing: Miss Raskin's insight matches her outreach and usually she balances the two better."
Anyone can read A & THE—the words that is, printed in boldface throughout the text: but the child who looks for them assiduously is apt to lose the thread of a tricky story, while on the other hand if he doesn't see T & C and recognize them when tie sees them, he may miss the point. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AND IT RAINED by Ellen Raskin
Released: Oct. 17, 1969

With one eye cocked on the weather, another on the clock, the tension mounts. . . will the pig, the parrot and the potto ever have a proper tea? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SILLY SONGS AND SAD by Ellen Raskin
Released: Sept. 15, 1967

"Kids will love the look of the book, pick and choose among the pages."
Ellen Raskin is surely one of the most witty, ingenious and versatile illustrators going, and this is distinctly successful as a demonstration of her many artistic talents, less satisfying as a collection of light verses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 29, 1971

"Noel glub C blub all. . . I glub new. . . ." Read full book review >