Search Results: "Ellen Stern"


BOOK REVIEW

HIRSCHFELD by Ellen Stern
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 10, 2017

"As the first substantive biography of Hirschfeld, this will be welcomed by art and Broadway lovers alike."
An in-depth biography of America's "line king" caricaturist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"Ought to be required reading for anyone looking to buy a suit or a tie—or, for that matter, a workshirt. (16-page color insert, not seen)"
A lively, confident memoir seriously explores the realities of the fashion industry, leavening its nuts-and-bolts acumen with personal warmth and just enough of the trade's time-tested potshots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I SAW A BULLFROG by Ellen Stern
ANIMALS
Released: April 22, 2003

"The failure here is not in quality of art, but of imagination; next to Jack Prelutsky's Scranimals, or Sarah Perry's If— (1995), too many of these creations just fall flat. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Stern showcases unusual facility at naturalistic depiction, but like the 11 imaginary animal hybrids that appear here, the result overall is neither fish nor fowl. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONCE UPON A TELEPHONE by Ellen Stern
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Still, there's probably a good argument to be made that the pranks of punk kids were preferable to the icy contempt of voice mail."
Among the more amusing facts in this cultural history of the telephone is that, back in the old days, women were called upon to be telephone operators because boys, who initially had the jobs, ``were ill-suited to the delicate work of telephony. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ELLEN ULLMAN
by Gregory McNamee

A thinking machine, grumbled the tradition-minded British writer G. K. Chesterton, “is a brainless phrase of modern fatalism and materialism.” He added, “A machine only is a machine because it cannot think.”

But that was at the turn of the last century. A dozen decades later, thinking machines are among us, machines that learn from our behavior and ...


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BLOG POST

ELLEN OH
by Alex Heimbach

Like most writers, Ellen Oh was an avid reader growing up. “Books were always my friends,” she says. At least until second grade, when her teacher read The Five Chinese Brothers to the class. Afterwards, her classmates taunted her with racial slurs, and one boy tried to paint her skin yellow because she was "the wrong color for a ...


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BLOG POST

A LEAGUE OF HER OWN
by Leila Roy

“I want you to do this because you genuinely want to play, not because—well, because you feel the weight of historical responsibility.”
“Can’t both be true?” Jill asked.
“I don’t know,” her mother said. “Can they?”
She sure hoped so.
A Season of Daring Greatly, by Ellen Emerson White

High school senior Jill Cafferty had ...


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BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 15, 1991

Here, dispensing limited but useful advice, Stern (Expecting Change; The Indispensable Woman—neither reviewed) focuses on the grievances of married women against their husbands, finding the sources of the complaints in false expectations, inappropriate attitudes, and failed communication. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMERICAN GOURMET by Jane Stern
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

The Sterns (The Encyclopedia of Bad Taste, 1990, etc.) step upscale for this treatment of the gourmet quarter-century they place between the first televised cooking show in 1946 and the opening of Alice Waters's Chez Panisse in 1971. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WAY OUT WEST by Jane Stern
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 30, 1993

"All in all, then, a lopsided, outdated guide, best suited for those who still think that Custer died with his boots on. (Photographs—200 b&w and 300 color)"
And somewhere out in left field, too: The Sterns' new addition to their popular volumes of Americana (The Encyclopedia of Bad Taste, Sixties People, Elvis World, etc.) tackles ``the West of the imagination''—the West mythologized by dime novels, TV, and films; populated by singing cowboys who kiss their horses, Indians who raise their right hands and say ``How,'' and pesky ``critters'' like rattlesnakes and scorpions; and redolent with the scent of hot chili and chicken-fried steak. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WALKING THROUGH POETRY by Sylvia Stern
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 9, 2016

"Gentle, soulful poems that shine a soft light on the human tendency toward wonder."
Stern's (Dancing with the Moon and the Stars, 2016) debut poetry collection travels the natural landscape and the inner pathways of mood in quiet, reflective verse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANOTHER SONG ABOUT THE KING by Kathryn Stern
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 14, 2000

"Middling."
A well-crafted if underplotted debut novel in which a daughter learns to forgive her high-maintenance, Elvis Presley-obsessed mother after a fatal illness brings the two together for those obligatory healing moments. Read full book review >