Search Results: "Elsa Warnick"


BOOK REVIEW

BEDTIME by Elsa  Warnick
by Elsa Warnick, illustrated by Elsa Warnick
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"With its whispered text and precise renderings, this is a gentle addition to the bedtime-book shelf, sure to lead children off to sleep. (Picture book. 1-3)"
A low-key bedtime book for toddlers has a gossamer plot and a simple presentation of familiar objects. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

Birds, butterflies, bats, spiders, and seeds journey on the air: blown by the wind, flying, gliding, and ballooning. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Still, Simon and Warnick beautifully succeed in capturing the wonder of the migratory process. (Picture book. 7-10)"
In a companion book to Ride the Wind (1997), Simon (see review, above) turns his attention to the migratory habits of marine plankton, plants, fish, and mammals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"Her intent is that her collection can be used by families of any religion. (Nonfiction. 2-5)"
The Divine Hours is a popular series of prayer manuals for adults written by Tickle, a well-known religious educator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2000

"This purportedly informational book may arouse more questions from attentive young readers than it answers. (Nonfiction. 69)"
The team that collaborated on two previous titles in this series, They Swim the Seas (1998) and Ride the Wind (1997), turns its attention to the overland migration of various groups of animals, including the Lapps of northern Norway. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Computers, cellular phones, Caller ID—readers will never take them for granted again after reading about their remarkable predecessors. (index, not seen, notes, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
This entertaining history of household objects provides the inventors, the ideas or needs behind the innovations, and the dates they were invented. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELSA SCHIAPARELLI by Meryle Secrest
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"Secrest ably chronicles Schiap's career and social life, mining others' memoirs and reflections to fashion a colorful portrait of her 'famously difficult' subject—but Schiap keeps the secrets of her heart."
The life of a flamboyant couturière. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELSA AND THE NIGHT by Jöns Mellgren
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2014

"A subdued, mildly soporific bedtime story with sophisticated emotional and metaphorical levels to explore for those so inclined. (Picture book. 5-8)"
In this poignant import, a lonely badger who hasn't slept in 30 years discovers Night hiding under her sofa and pops it into a cake tin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"An animated and intelligent biography."
Movie biographer Staggs' (Born to Be Hurt: The Untold Story of Imitation of Life, 2009, etc.) lively account of how a jowly plain Jane from Iowa became the 20th century's most celebrated "party giver for the rich, the royal, [and] the famous." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELSA, STAR OF THE SHELTER! by Jacqueline Wilson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"Sharratt's black-and-white drawings—stick figures, silly asides, etc.—give this the feel of a child's journal but also make it difficult to take Elsa's very real travails seriously. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Elsa, narrator and aspiring comedienne, is growing up below the poverty line in England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A JOURNEY WITH ELSA CLOUD by Leila Hadley
Released: May 15, 1997

"All of this, including her therapist's Jungian admonitions, are connected in some way; but even as the reader sometimes wishes Hadley's writings were less fevered, one must admire her honesty and industriousness in producing a rather monumental work. (Author tour)"
In a weighty account, kitchen sink included, a proper, upper- class mother visits her estranged daughter in India and during their perambulations through the countryside achieve a better, if not complete, appreciation for each other's viewpoint. Read full book review >