Search Results: "Emily Raboteau"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 8, 2013

"An excellent choice for readers interested in religion, philosophy and the elusive concept of home."
Rather than a simple analysis of where scattered Africans ended up geographically, Raboteau (The Professor's Daughter, 2006) dissects the search for home as a search for belonging. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PROFESSOR’S DAUGHTER by Emily Raboteau
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 3, 2005

"Part literary saga, part litany of righteous parables: an impassioned, poetic work that offers commitment as compensation for its overdeterminism."
An award-winning storywriter's first novel underscores the effects of racism on three generations of an African-American family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 7, 1995

"Comprehensive, clearly organized, and low-keyjust the kind of thoughtful, undogmatic approach this material needs."
A well-researched look at black Americans and religion, dispelling the notion that the slaves accepted their masters' beliefs without question. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

TEA TO SEE
by Jennie K.

BOOK REPORT for The Leaf Reader by Emily Arsenault

Cover Story: Drink Me
BFF Charm: Maybe
Swoonworthy Scale: 2
Talky Talk: Straight Up With A Twist
Bonus Factor: Tasseomancy
Relationship Status: Not Seeing A Future

Cover Story: Drink Me

I like this cover well enough—the shattered teacup is a little on the nose, but the painting-like quality and dark tones ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

BEAR & HARE GO FISHING by Emily Gravett
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 7, 2015

"Funny and quick, with excellent art that's curbed by its tight frame. (Picture book. 2-5)"
An easygoing fishing trip yields unexpected catches. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MATILDA'S CAT by Emily Gravett
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 18, 2014

"Even Matilda's cat would like this. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A master of animal countenance, Gravett pairs an expressive cat with a busy kid and winks at the difference between textual and visual message. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE CHAMELEON by Emily Gravett
ANIMALS
Released: March 8, 2011

"Both chameleons and friendship populate children's picture books liberally, but this one's well worth adding to the shelf. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A lonely chameleon pines for a pal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE GARDENER by Emily Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"A lovely visual tribute to the persistent hard work behind every flourishing garden. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A lad scarcely bigger than his pet worm struggles to maintain a large garden by himself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AGAIN! by Emily Gravett
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 16, 2013

"This little bit of bedtime foolery feels a little incomplete, but it should strike a chord—and it's far wittier than the similarly themed Go the Fuck to Sleep. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Gravett, that master of the metafictive die cut, returns for a savvy bedtime satire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE MOUSE’S BIG BOOK OF FEARS by Emily Gravett
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 16, 2008

"Timorous Mouse doesn't vanquish the worries but does weather the dangers, revealing a tiny final smile at an unexpected turnabout. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Under the guise of a self-help book whose instructions are obediently followed by a mouse taking notes on the pages, Gravett takes readers on an intense exploration of fear. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ODD EGG by Emily Gravett
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 27, 2009

"A gem of persistence and sweetness. (Picture book. 3-7)"
This simple plot, illustrated in delicately winsome pencil and buoyant watercolor, will make readers jump at the upshot—and return to be startled again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPELLS by Emily Gravett
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 6, 2009

"A torn scrap on the endpaper explains it all, delicately hinting the criticality of reading the small print when casting spells. (Picture book. 3-6)"
What if you found a book of spells—but wished it were something else? Read full book review >