Search Results: "Emma Woolf"


BOOK REVIEW

AN APPLE A DAY by Emma Woolf
Released: May 14, 2013

"Insightful and informative, with fresh insights into the nature of eating disorders."
British journalist Woolf documents her struggle with anorexia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MINISTRY OF THIN by Emma Woolf
NON-FICTION
Released: June 10, 2014

"Relevant, engrossing and sure to help liberate those in the throes of a weight battle or lifestyle crisis."
A thorough analysis of our weight-obsessed culture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: March 1, 1993

"An intelligent survey, sure to awaken interest. (Nonfiction. 9+)"
The author of a workmanlike but traditional introduction to the history of painting (Picture This, 1990) takes a livelier approach to 20th-century art, offering two or three contrasting examples in each of 14 styles or schools, most (to some degree) representational: cubism, surrealism, pop art, etc. Some of the juxtapositions are imaginative: a Calder mobile and a Hepworth abstraction are grouped as ``Sea Sculptures,'' while Frankenthaler and de Kooning's otherwise dissimilar paintings derive some of their impact from their mammoth size; commendably, Woolf reminds readers to note a work's dimensions when considering the rather small but perfectly clear color reproductions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROCKABYE by Rebecca Woolf
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2008

"Periodically charming but mostly pedestrian."
I'm young, I'm cool, I'm having a kid and I'm gonna get blog-ish about it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIVE BLACK CATS by Patricia Hegarty
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"For toddlers unafraid of typical Halloween imagery. (Board book. 2-4)"
A troop of cats traverse a spooky landscape as they make their way to a party hosted by ghosts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SNOW WONDER by Charles Ghigna
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 28, 2008

"It's a workmanlike, unassuming contribution to the body of literature for early readers—while it'll get the job done, one wishes it could have been executed with a bit more subtlety, both visually and textually. (Early reader. 4-6)"
Rhyming sentences celebrate the joys of winter, from sledding, skating and building snowmen to baking cookies, sipping cocoa and reading by the fire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN OF THE HOLOCAUST by Alex Woolf
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2014

"It's a quick skim with higgledy-piggledy page design, but it's carefully tuned to spark thought and discussion rather than to shock alone. (timeline, websites, fiction and nonfiction bibliographies, index) (Nonfiction. 11-13)"
A Holocaust mosaic with a particular focus on children, constructed from period photos and short extracts from diaries or survivors' accounts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLUTTERBY BUTTERFLY by Emma Parrish
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 21, 2015

"Flutterby Butterfly's mild mystery makes for good, interactive fun. (Board book. 1-3)"
This interactive board book is actually sturdy enough for young children to manipulate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ORION AND THE DARK by Emma Yarlett
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2015

"A funny, savvy bedtime story that addresses common fears. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A friendly, benign-looking creature called the Dark takes the boy Orion on a fear-conquering adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUDIE NUDIE by Emma Quay
by Emma Quay, illustrated by Emma Quay
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2014

"A bracing burst of joie de vivre, ideal for any rude, nude, naked brood. (Picture book. 2-6)"
This Australian import features two imps who take a particular pleasure in gamboling about sans covering. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I LOVE BUGS! by Emma Dodd
by Emma Dodd, illustrated by Emma Dodd
ANIMALS
Released: March 15, 2010

"EWSLUGp1999 or Denise Fleming's taxonomically correct Beetle Bop (2007) as a springboard for an adjective lesson or on its own, this is just plain fun. (Picture book. 3-7)"
This young narrator loves bugs of all sorts, including several creepy-crawlies that are not bugs or even insects. Read full book review >