Search Results: "Enola Prudhomme"


BOOK REVIEW

ENOLA PRUDHOMME'S LOW-FAT FAVORITES by Enola Prudhomme
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 20, 1994

"It may be low-fat, but it ain't healthy."
Prudhomme (Enola Prudhomme's Low-Calorie Cajun Cooking, 1991) has flooded this volume with enough processed foods to turn the Louisiana bayou into a chemical bath. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ENOLA PRUDHOMME'S LOW-CALORIE CAJUN COOKING by Enola Prudhomme
NON-FICTION
Released: April 19, 1991

"Other tacky ingredients such as canned cream-of- mushroom soup turn up here and there, adding to the mongrel air."
Low-fat collage cheese in Cajun dishes is certainly a novelty; and that, besides the family name, is mainly what this Louisiana restaurant owner, sister of the famous Paul, and contributor to The Prudhomme family cookbook (1987) has going for her here. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ENOLA GAY by Mark LeVine
Released: April 1, 2000

"If you've been to one Armageddon, you've been to them all."
Levine is the author of a previous collection of poetry, Debt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"More please. (Mystery. 9-12)"
Although their own eccentricities are legendary, Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes fully expect their very much younger sister to take on the attributes of the stereotypical Victorian female. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"A tasty appetizer, with every sign of further courses to come. (Fiction. 10-12)"
With gleeful panache, Springer introduces an innocent but capable young sleuth—the younger sister of Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes, no less—and takes her from wild English countryside to the soupy filth of Victorian London. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 5, 1996

"This round of history wars, conclude the writers in this excellent collection, was won by the myth-makers."
Linenthal (Preserving Memory: The Struggle to Create America's Holocaust Museum, 1995, etc.), Engelhardt, and six other historians use a bitter controversy to consider America's attitudes toward its past. Read full book review >