Search Results: "Eric Asimov"


BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO LOVE WINE by Eric  Asimov
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"A friendly, well-written approach to enjoying wine, full of low-stress recommendations to help avoid wine anxiety."
A wine expert who finds fault with tasting notes, wine scores and blind tasting claims that "what's missing in many people's experience of wine is a simple sense of ease." Read full book review >

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MISSING SENSES
by Mandy Curtis

BOOK REPORT for Not If I See You First by Eric Lindstrom

Cover Story: Secret Message

BFF Charm: Big Sister

Swoonworthy Scale: 5

Talky Talk: Real Talk

Bonus Factor: Friendships

Relationship Status: See You Later, Alligator

 

Cover Story: Secret Message

At first, I assumed that the Braille on the cover—side note: if the dots aren’t actually raised on the ...


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COLOR COMMENTARY
by Julie Danielson

I’ve always found it difficult to answer the what’s-your-favorite-color question, as the answer depends entirely on my mood. (I like deep blues for more contemplative times, but I need sunny yellow to help wake me in the mornings.)

Perhaps it’s even harder for artists to pick a favorite color. Is it like asking them to pick a favorite child? I ...


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BOOK REVIEW

NORBY AND THE COURT JESTER by Janet Asimov
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 22, 1991

"Part old-fashioned Saturday movie serial, part G&S operetta, and all preposterous: good, clean fun, and the loose ends can go into another book. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In the tenth book about Jeff Wells and his appealing little robot, Norby, the two careen through time and space yet again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1987

"For the more jaded reader, it will seem offhand and superficial."
Pointers for established, novice and would-be writers by a very successful one and his wife. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1986

"As usual, the Asimovs have crowded history, science, and a good yarn into a few short pages."
Another romp, fifth in the series, involving Norby the time-twisting robot and his human friends, Jeff, Fargo, and Albany, by sci-fi icon Asimov and his wife Janet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEGINNING AND THE END by Isaac Asimov
Released: Oct. 14, 1977

"Aside from the general information content the book might show would-be writers how a pro popularizes science for a wide market."
Another Asimov Anthology—in case you missed those articles in Playboy, TV Guide, or your favorite in-flight airline magazine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIEW FROM A HEIGHT by Isaac Asimov
Released: Sept. 6, 1963

"These are excellent examples of the modern scientific essay which very few writers today can equal in style, form, and content."
Seventeen crackerjack essays again give witness to the clarity and pleasure with which Asimov writes on favorite topics in biology, physics, chemistry, and astronomy for the reader with a modicum of knowledge and interest in science subjects. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EARLY ASIMOV by Isaac Asimov
Released: Sept. 15, 1972

"It's a nostalgic journey through the pulps of the '40's with all Asimov's themes from positronic robots to mathematical psychology to galactic empire putting in an appearance, laced with fond reminiscences of editor John Campbell who presided over SF's golden age and with exhaustive reports on each story clown to the last penny it brought in the marketplace."
The title is only half the story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEST SCIENCE FICTION OF ISAAC ASIMOV by Isaac Asimov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 15, 1986

"Still, Asimovophiles will probably relish the cozy geniality of it all, and some curious browsers may be attracted too."
Twenty-eight tales, 1951-80, chosen by Asimov himself; excluded are the robot yarns (The Complete Robot, 1982), and "Nightfall," his best-known story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 28, 1979

"False leads, true finds, theories rejected and resurrected, and an outright fraud (Piltdown Man) are all part of the story, which Asimov tells with matter-of-fact dispatch if not distinction. (Wool's drawings, however, give the book a cheap, dreary, textbookish look.)"
From belief in Adam and Eve and a 6,000-year-old universe, Asimov traces the discoveries that have helped us piece together the history of man's origins. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 8, 1974

"Marginal."
The latest in Asimov's lightweight science history series covers the well-worn path from Leeuwenhoek's observations with his primitive lenses to the discovery of the tobacco mosaic virus. Read full book review >