Search Results: "Eric Asimov"


BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO LOVE WINE by Eric  Asimov
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"A friendly, well-written approach to enjoying wine, full of low-stress recommendations to help avoid wine anxiety."
A wine expert who finds fault with tasting notes, wine scores and blind tasting claims that "what's missing in many people's experience of wine is a simple sense of ease." Read full book review >

BLOG POST

COLOR COMMENTARY
by Julie Danielson

I’ve always found it difficult to answer the what’s-your-favorite-color question, as the answer depends entirely on my mood. (I like deep blues for more contemplative times, but I need sunny yellow to help wake me in the mornings.)

Perhaps it’s even harder for artists to pick a favorite color. Is it like asking them to pick a favorite child? I ...


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BOOK REVIEW

NORBY AND THE COURT JESTER by Janet Asimov
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 22, 1991

"Part old-fashioned Saturday movie serial, part G&S operetta, and all preposterous: good, clean fun, and the loose ends can go into another book. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In the tenth book about Jeff Wells and his appealing little robot, Norby, the two careen through time and space yet again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1987

"For the more jaded reader, it will seem offhand and superficial."
Pointers for established, novice and would-be writers by a very successful one and his wife. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1986

"As usual, the Asimovs have crowded history, science, and a good yarn into a few short pages."
Another romp, fifth in the series, involving Norby the time-twisting robot and his human friends, Jeff, Fargo, and Albany, by sci-fi icon Asimov and his wife Janet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TODAY AND TOMORROW AND. . . . by Isaac Asimov
Released: April 13, 1973

"Well prepared in the author's serendipitous style, this volume reads easily and is entertaining, appealing to readers interested in the natural world and the interactions of science and society."
Is the duckbilled platypus your thing? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1981

"Both books contain the odd interesting item, but Solar Power has at best a skimpy utility and Volcanoes less."
These latest additions to Asimov's science-history series don't explain their scientific subjects with any flair or special care. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIEW FROM A HEIGHT by Isaac Asimov
Released: Sept. 6, 1963

"These are excellent examples of the modern scientific essay which very few writers today can equal in style, form, and content."
Seventeen crackerjack essays again give witness to the clarity and pleasure with which Asimov writes on favorite topics in biology, physics, chemistry, and astronomy for the reader with a modicum of knowledge and interest in science subjects. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEBULA AWARD STORIES EIGHT by Isaac Asimov
Released: Nov. 14, 1973

"First-rate."
The latest Nebula Award collection deserves an award itself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOLD by Isaac Asimov
Released: March 1, 1995

"But the pleasure would have been enhanced if somebody had bothered to provide an introduction and some much needed background information."
A posthumous anthology of previously uncollected science fiction writings from Asimov (192092; Forward the Foundation, 1993, etc.) comprising 15 stories, 18 nonfiction pieces about science fiction, and 20 essays on the craft of writing science fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ABC'S OF ECOLOGY by Isaac Asimov
Released: Sept. 5, 1972

"The book is printed on recycled paper and we can assume too that it's compiled from scraps of recycled data out of Dr. A's copious files."
This is the fourth of Asimov's ABC books and like the others it suffers from the inaptness of the concept itself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROMAN EMPIRE by Isaac Asimov
Released: March 1, 1967

"Despite its positive points, most youngsters will find this unrewardingly tedious and would be better served by a more selective approach."
The Table of Contents, a tabulation of ruling lines and rulers, is the tip-off: like its predecessor, The Roman Republic (1966, 515, J-175), this is detailed political history, reign by reign, in this case, with occasional sorties into literature, philosophy and science. Read full book review >