Search Results: "Eric Flint"


BOOK REVIEW

FORTUNE’S STROKE by Eric Flint
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 2000

"Impressive, historically, less persuasive in the execution; still, the premise is certainly different and should appeal beyond the usual fan base."
Another entry in the authors' established military-historical fantasy series (Destiny's Shield, 1999) set in the Roman Empire of the sixth century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TYRANT by Eric Flint
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2001

"Fans will be pleased."
A sequel to The Reformer (not reviewed) by polycollaborative Drake and Steve Stirling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIVERS OF WAR by Eric Flint
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 2005

"A pleasant diversion for military history buffs, but other readers will likely desert."
First of a two-volume alternate history saga from the author of 1632 (2000, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

1632 by Eric Flint
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"Sinewy shoot—-em-up, with pikes and muzzle-loaders squared off against modern automatics and 20th-century tactics: a rollicking, good-natured, fact-based flight of fancy that should appeal to alternate-history buffs as well as military-fantasy fans."
From the co-author (with David Drake) of Destiny's Shield (p. 760) and a solo yarn, Mother of Demons (1997, not reviewed), a neat what-if that Flint barely troubles to justify: What if a six-mile-diameter chunk of 1999 West Virginia, complete with people, structures, and technology, were suddenly and instantaneously ripped away and inserted into East Germany in 1632? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHADOW OF THE LION by Mercedes Lackey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 2001

"Tor should get fantasists who write with this straightforward strength and avoid broadstrokes through heavy cream."
Supercolossal New Age fantasy set in 1537 Venice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DESTINY'S SHIELD by Eric Flint
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1999

"8216;Tis a pity the dialogue's often conspicuously awful."
Third entry in an established military/historical SF series (An Oblique Approach and In the Heart of Darkness, not seen). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WARMASTERS by David Weber
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 2001

Military science fiction in three novellas from Drake, Weber, and Flint with characters or plotlines from the authors' well-known multivolume series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PHILOSOPHICAL STRANGLER by Eric Flint
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 2001

"Episodic (a series of short stories really, rather than a novel), lively, and amusing if somewhat same-ish: should go down well with fans who like their fantasy spiced with a little humor."
New tongue-in-cheek fantasy from the author of 1632 (2000) and various collaborations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TIDE OF VICTORY by Eric Flint
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 2001

"Turbid dialogue, flavorless descriptive passages, and characters so obvious and numerous that it's almost a relief when the bombs and bullets blow them away."
By far the weakest and gassiest installment of this sixth-century alternate history series in which two entities from the far future attempt to rewrite the past by introducing new technology, glimpses of possible futures, and a quote or two from Dr. Johnson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RATS, BATS & VATS by Dave Freer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Inventive and often smile-worthy, though it's far from certain that the authors' unlikely setup hangs logically together."
Noirish comedy alien shoot-'em-up, from paperback author Freer and collaborator Flint (1632, Feb. 2000, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FORWARD THE MAGE by Eric Flint
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Really."
Fantasy sequel to Flint's episodic and tongue-in-cheek solo novel The Philosophical Strangler (2001), which featured the giant professional strangler (and quandary-crazed amateur philosopher) Greyboar, his disgruntled sidekick agent/manager Ignace, the cult of Joe (the caveman who invented Old Geister—or God—and so had Joe's Big Mountains, Joe's Mountains, Joe's Hills, Joe's Favorite Woods, and Joe's Sea named after him), and Greyboar's Kantian qualms about the meaning of it all as a strangler and his moral aversion to strangling a girl (he doesn't do women). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PYRAMID SCHEME by David Freer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Swift and engrossing fun, the unresolved philosophical mystery smacking of Stanislaw Lem."
Freer (The Forlorn, 1999) and Flint (1632, 2000) join to describe what happens when a small alien probe called a Krim travels 2740 light-years through a wormhole and lands in the Regenstein Library of the University of Chicago. Read full book review >