Search Results: "Eric Morse"


BOOK REVIEW

THE DOG STAYS IN THE PICTURE by Susan Morse
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 29, 2014

"A low-key and authentic memoir."
One woman's story of facing domestic changes in midlife with the assistance of an anxious dog. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUNGER by Jackie Morse Kessler
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"Adult author Kessler's concept and characters may not be wholly original, as she indicates in her author's note, but her ear for dialogue, fluid prose and dark humor elevate this brief novel above other 'issue books.' (eating-disorder resources) (Fiction. 12 & up)"
After a half-hearted suicide attempt, anorexic teen Lisabeth Lewis inherits the responsibilities of Famine, one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, in this book of revelations and Revelations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 15, 2012

"Worth a peek for armchair voyagers."
"Uncle" Bob Harris is a world traveler, adventurer and, quite possibly, a spy for the U.S. government. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE INVISIBILITY CLOAK by Ge Fei
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"The plot may be slight, but the author packs in wit, social commentary, and an emotional depth that will lift the reader's spirits like few recent books."
This slim comic novel, the first by acclaimed Chinese author Ge Fei to be translated into English, follows the travails of a likable loser trying to stay afloat—financially and emotionally—in contemporary Beijing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BREATH by Jackie Morse Kessler
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 16, 2013

"Death and his riders strive to bring balance, and Kessler (Loss, 2012, etc.) begins to achieve it in this series conclusion. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
Death speaks, and Xander Atwood listens in this conclusion to a gripping, if uneven series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAGE by Jackie Morse Kessler
Released: April 4, 2011

"Dark humor and realistic situations cannot overcome the swiftly staling premise. (author's note) (Fiction. 14 & up)"
High-school student Melissa Miller wears black and cuts herself, seeking refuge in self-harm and soccer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE SISTER FOR SALE by Morse Hamilton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"A warm, satisfying story of natural rivalry resolved—for the moment. (Picture book. 4-8)"
After little Abby not only cuts the hair of Kate's favorite doll but borrows Kate's toothbrush (``Maybe it fell in the toilet,'' Abby suggests when confronted), Kate has had enough. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOOP GENIUS by John Coy
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"Given its limited scope, both hoops fans—who will be familiar with this story from rule and sports-history books—and newbies may feel this book has left them circling the rim. (author's note; selected bibliography) (Informational picture book. 5-10)"
This picture-book basketball history spotlights how James Naismith came to invent the game now played around the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOSS by Jackie Morse Kessler
Released: March 20, 2012

"A book about 'bullies and bruises and babysitting Gramps' with apocalyptic interludes—the End cannot come quickly enough. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
Bullied Billy Ballard must take Pestilence's crown and ride with the Horsemen of the Apocalypse or let the world be destroyed, in this third book in the Riders of the Apocalypse Quartet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 15, 1991

"A knowledgeable, albeit less than cohesive, progress report on a consequential scandal."
Less than two years after federal 'commod' squads obtained indictments against over 40 traders at the Windy City's two principal futures exchanges, volume remains as high as ever. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"A wake-up call? Absolutely. Readers don't need to buy all the data to get the message, especially where events in America and abroad conspire to increase child poverty and deprivation."
Investigation of the importance of attachment between baby and caretaker—usually the mother—in setting the path to physical and mental health. Read full book review >