Search Results: "Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt"


BOOK REVIEW

THE WOMAN WITH THE BOUQUET by Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"While all of Schmitt's stories are well worth reading, when an ironic conclusion becomes predictable (à la O. Henry), it subverts its own desire to surprise."
Illuminating stories about the everyday—self-image, problematic relationships, the need for love—marred only by Schmitt's unfortunate tendency to use heavy-handed irony in the stories' conclusions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THREE WOMEN IN A MIRROR by Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 2, 2013

"Schmitt's three complex stories are beautifully translated and masterfully written."
Schmitt (Concerto to the Memory of an Angel, 2011, etc.) writes movingly about three women, divided by time and distance, whose lives connect when they attempt to break free of expectations imposed by society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL BOOK IN THE WORLD by Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2009

"Fairy tales and realistic studies happily coexist in this elegant collection."
Eight stories about a variety of women from French playwright/novelist Schmitt (Monsieur Ibrahim and the Flowers of the Koran & Oscar and the Lady in Pink, 2004, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAROUSEL OF DESIRE by Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"Middling literary erotica: not quite Kundera but raw enough to satisfy a curious teenager."
"He had made love to her so well that she hated him": a steamy Belgian bestseller makes its way across the pond. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 16, 2011

"A mildly reassuring argument that, after an expensive and massive effort, terrorism seems on the decline."
Spectacular events such as Osama bin Laden's assassination make headlines, but this book makes a case that intelligence (both tactical and cerebral) leads the battle against international terrorism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WISDOM OF GOD by Emmanuel
NON-FICTION
Released: May 23, 2007

"Neither a strong, coherent spiritual guide nor a work of wisdom."
A spiritual guide for members of the New Church, a denomination whose teachings are from the book of Revelations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"A confusing mix of authentic 18th-century mysticism and New Age propheteering."
A dismaying work of theological plagiarism masquerading as revealed literature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ADVERSARY by Emmanuel Carrère
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 9, 2001

"True-life crime, bald and sordid, told with the quality of a weightless incantation."
A grim recounting—almost a slice of living theater—of a loathsome crime committed in France nearly ten years ago, from French novelist Carrère (Class Trip, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"An accomplished first novel that effectively blends folklore with the evening news."
A novel about one old man's fight against the machinations of city hall. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AERIALIST by Richard Schmitt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 17, 2000

"A fine debut novel, from a writer who has avoided the usual clichés and produced a work of genuine originality."
A gritty, solidly detailed first novel, set among traveling circuses and their world-weary "artists" and workingmen: the best novel of its kind since Edward Hoagland's Cat Man (1955). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ALICE APP by Lewis Carroll
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 15, 2014

"Though Alice apps abound, this offers some audio and visual pleasures of its own. (Requires iOS 6.0 and above.) (iPad storybook app. 10-13)"
A full version of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, expressively read in a semi-British accent and decorated with illustrations that echo the elegant surrealism, and often the composition, of Tenniel's originals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHNNY MAD DOG by Emmanuel Dongala
Released: May 5, 2005

"One respects this earnest tale's passion and indignation, but little else. Johnny is a posturing monster, Laokolé a stoical saint, and every action and thought of each is reduced to melodramatic cliché. The result is an all-too-credible horror story, but not a good novel."
The native Congolese author, now Massachusetts-based, writes of civil war and its attendant atrocities. Read full book review >