Search Results: "Ernest Cline"


BOOK REVIEW

READY PLAYER ONE by Ernest Cline
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 16, 2011

"Too much puzzle-solving, not enough suspense."
Video-game players embrace the quest of a lifetime in a virtual world; screenwriter Cline's first novel is old wine in new bottles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARMADA by Ernest Cline
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 14, 2015

"A hackneyed sci-fi spectacle."
From the author of Ready Player One (2011), another book centered around video games and the 1980s.Read full book review >

BLOG POST

OPEN THE POD BAY DOOR
by Jennie K.

BOOK REPORT for Armada by Ernest Cline

Cover Story: Pew Pew Pew!

BFF Charm: Yay

Swoonworthy Scale: 3

Talky Talk: Space Crusaders

Bonus Factor: Mixtape

Relationship Status: Be My Wingman

 

Cover Story: Pew Pew Pew!

This cover is well-designed without pandering; it calls to mind ’80s video games without being too obvious. As you read, you find out ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

WOMEN, PASSION AND CELIBACY by Sally Cline
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 16, 1994

"An angry little book, full of ammunition for the war between the sexes."
A modern-day (and humorless) Lysistrata, in which celibacy is not a means for forcing men to end a war but for women to achieve political power and independence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUST DESSERTS by Sally Cline
NON-FICTION
Released: July 15, 1991

"But without much analysis or any direction for change, it sounds mostly like a lot of good old-fashioned unliberated whining."
Midway through this extended collage of kvetching, British feminist Cline (co-author, Reflecting Men, 1987) cites a finding that women do not view cooking as drudgery and in fact can find it ``a creative and enjoyable process.'' But that gets lost in the barrage of quotes from women who hate themselves for secret bingeing, or are terrorized by the demands of raging, loutish husbands for hot meat-centered meals (and heaven help her if he sees any gristle!), or lose sleep and miss out on career advancement for worrying about what to serve their families for dinner, or feel physically sick when they find themselves in supermarkets. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2001

"A thoughtful and fascinating account."
A well-crafted study of the treatment of the disabled in early American society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAD BOYS by Ernest Hebert
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 10, 1993

"Commendable for its new (if not especially promising) direction, but a botch all the same."
Hebert has forsaken his Darby series of novels about rural New Hampshire (The Dogs of March, 1979; A Little More Than Kin, 1982, etc.)—and realism itself, for that matter—to journey among the cyberpunky ideas of virtual reality and road-novel fecklessness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SATISFIED WITH NOTHIN' by Ernest Hill
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"As subtle as a sledgehammer, Hill's polemical fiction, punctuated with lots of stilted speechmaking, is primarily addressed to black men—it's long on sociology and implied uplift, short on nuance or art."
Hill's odd first novel, previously self-published, can be read two ways: either as an advertisement for a Tony Brownstyle self- help black nationalism or as a cautionary tale on what happens when you see everything through the distorting lens of race. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NICK ADAMS STORIES by Ernest Hemingway
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 17, 1972

"There are eight new stories constituting 40% of the book and extending its interest as unpublished rather than merely republished Hemingway."
A short preface by Philip Young explains the raison d'etre of this presentation of the Nick Adams stories which here are arranged chronologically and therefore provide a continuity — from child to adolescent to soldier to writer — and reveal the character developmentally. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREEN HILLS OF AFRICA by Ernest Hemingway
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1935

"Appearing in Scribners Magazine."
The Hemingway name will carry this beyond what the usual casual interest in reminiscences of hunting in Africa would ordinarily achieve. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 11, 1998

"Enlivened by epistolary amours and detective-like research revelations, yet still a sluggish rendition of a resonant tale. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
An admirable if not always compelling exploration of a once-sensational murder and trial that recall our recent obsession with the Simpson case. Read full book review >