Search Results: "Ernest Freeberg"


BOOK REVIEW

ERNEST by Wilson White
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"A wistful remembrance of what was and what might have been, though far more whimsical than the author himself might have demanded."
This madcap tribute to American novelist and short-story master Ernest Hemingway is a rambunctious mesh of reality and fantasy, a what-if romp both childish and charming. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2001

"A thoughtful and fascinating account."
A well-crafted study of the treatment of the disabled in early American society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2013

"A genial, sometimes-jolting account of the social and political consequences of crying, 'Fiat lux!'"
Freeberg (History/Univ. of Tennessee; Democracy's Prisoner: Eugene V. Debs, the Great War, and the Right to Dissent, 2008) returns with a survey of the transformative changes wrought in American culture by electric light. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ERNEST HEMINGWAY by Catherine Reef
BIOGRAPHY
Released: July 1, 2009

"Accessible to young readers but most useful to teens as they begin to read Hemingway's greatest works. (source notes, bibliography, list of major works, picture credits) (Biography. 10 & up)"
Opening with a vivid description of bullfights in Pamplona, which Hemingway saw as "death struggle raised to an art," and concluding with Hemingway's own death struggle in 1961, Reef creates a memorable portrait of the writer and his times, and even readers too young for most of Hemingway's oeuvre will enjoy armchair traveling to the bullfights in Spain, fishing expeditions to the Dry Tortugas and the Marquesas Keys, big-game hunting on the Serengeti and covering the Spanish Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 1, 1992

"Bibliography; b&w photos and index not seen. (Biography. 12-15)"
In tedious, anecdotal fashion, Lyttle delivers a broadside against Hemingway's Tough Guy image rather than discussing the relationship between his life and work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ERNEST HEMINGWAY by Mary V. Dearborn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 16, 2017

"A thorough, but familiar, portrait of a tormented artist."
The rise and fall of the Nobel Prize-winning writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Whether or not you buy into this version of the Gallo story, it's a family saga with all the makings of a television miniseries: adversity, intrigue, tragedy, manipulation, greed, and a slick presentation. (60 b&w photos, not seen)"
Though the Gallos' wines might repulse you and their reputation give you the willies, their autobiography is worth a look, if only to get another side of the picture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 29, 1967

"As Lillian Ross might have put it, Hem feller have heap big magic."
A lifetime selection of Hemingway's professional non-fiction as a reporter and columnist, this is a long-awaited book in the hardcover canon of the century's most imitated and most envied writer, and the man who built the tallest legend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 2, 1987

"Moments of interest, but luckiest are those who still have their copies of The First Forty-Nine."
What's most worthy in this hefty, three-part volume of still more Hemingway is that it contains (in its first section) all the stories that appeared together in the 1938 (and now out of print) The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LETTERS OF ERNEST HEMINGWAY by Ernest Hemingway
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 22, 2015

"A meticulously edited volume offering an unvarnished portrait."
The third volume of a projected 17-volume collection of Hemingway's letters covers three years during which the author rose to literary fame with the publication of The Sun Also Rises (1926), Torrents of Spring (1926), and the collection Men Without Women (1927).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1978

"Burgess shows respect for Hemingway's innovative prose procedures and sadness about his increasingly pathological life—all in that graceful Burgess style, not too tricky for once—but finally it's like a little wave too late and from too far away: a gesture, and of no consequence whatsoever."
With nothing near the sympathetic engagement he finds with Joyce, Burgess comes rather diffidently to this once-over-lightly biography of Hemingway—short text, page-sized pictures, the barest critical attention to the work. Read full book review >