Search Results: "Ernesto Cuevas"


BOOK REVIEW

ERNESTO by Umberto Saba
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 28, 2017

"An exciting, pithy translation that will surely leave readers electrified and wanting to read more of Saba's work."
Set at the cusp of the 20th century, Saba's story takes the reader into the mind of a teenager in small-town Trieste, Italy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FEATHERLESS/DESPLUMADO by Juan Felipe Herrera
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Both Spanish and English texts are direct, inviting, and expressive. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Like his pet bird Desplumado, featherless and with a drawn-in foot, Tomasito can't fly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 13, 2006

"A skewering of far-left politics that's best when it sticks to behind-the-scenes machinations in Washington, worst when it dips into ideology."
Part-time cokehead, small-time gambler and sort-of-full-time speechwriter Peter Holmes Dickinson ("of the Main Line Dickinsons") juggles his women, his money and his ideologically wayward clients. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONFESSIONS OF AN IMAGINARY FRIEND by Michelle Cuevas
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Though the writing is clever and there are plenty of amusing incidents included, life lessons and existential truths overwhelm everything, suggesting that the audience for this uneasy amalgam of whimsy and wisdom will be small. (Fiction. 8-10)"
An imaginary friend who yearns to be real learns about life along with the children who conjure him up in a variety of guises. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CARE AND FEEDING OF A PET BLACK HOLE by Michelle Cuevas
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 12, 2017

"An original tale of family love, scientific passion, and a truly epic journey of self-discovery. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Instead of a lost kitten, 11-year-old Stella "Bug" Rodriguez rescues a black hole she names Larry ("short for Singularity, which I'd read is a place of infinite gravity at the heart of a black hole"). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAZARUS RUMBA by Ernesto Mestre
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 23, 1999

"Mestre's overall theme and thrust may feel familiar (in addition to Garc°a M†rquez's, the presence of Isabel Allende's The House of the Spirits lies behind it), but his gifts for hyperbolic, though intensely realistic, character creation and brilliant narrative momentum are his own."
The enormous influence of Gabriel Garc°a M†rquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude on Latin American literature bears its finest fruit so far in this stunning exploration of the Castro Revolution's roots, character, and consequences. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHANGO’S FIRE by Ernesto Quinonez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Chango's Fire is, therefore, a rough patch in the road. Still, Quiñonez appears to be on his way to artistic maturity."
Making do and getting by in present-day Spanish Harlem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MASTERWORK OF A PAINTING ELEPHANT by Michelle Cuevas
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"A touching, singular story of a painting elephant and the boy he lovingly fosters. (Fiction. 6-12)"
A little boy and a nurturing elephant embark on a memorable search and find adventure, fame and the meaning of home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ANGEL OF DARKNESS by Ernesto Sabato
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Heavy-going."
A dense and often leaden novel by Argentinean writer Sabato (On Heroes and Tombs, 1981) that comes to life—and that only momentarily—in the last 40 or so pages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMOOT by Michelle Cuevas
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 12, 2017

"Not since Peter Pan's has a shadow commanded such well-deserved attention. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In the middle of a city filled with Old World stuccoed walls and tiled roofs, a boy's shadow yearns to break free. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEYOND THE LAUGHING SKY by Michelle Cuevas
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 2, 2014

"'There's things you've seen and things you may not have, but there ain't nothing that's impossible, sugar,' says a village widow; readers will end the book with a new sense of possible. (Magical realism. 8-11)"
Nashville, who has qualities both human and birdlike, feels compelled to follow his avian destiny. Read full book review >