Search Results: "Esther Averill"


BOOK REVIEW

ESTHER by Rebecca Kanner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"Kanner's second novel is animated but ultimately fails to leave a deep impression."
The book of Esther comes to life in this vivid novel based on the Old Testament tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 13, 1994

"Suspenseful and awful in its grisly details, but done with good taste and compassion."
Sanders (Fort Worth, 1984, etc.) puts the novelist's eye for detail and a sharp sense of pace to good use in this outstanding true-crime narrative about the rape and murder of a retired Oklahoma schoolteacher. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JENNY'S FIRST PARTY by Esther Averill
Released: March 3, 1948

"A distinctive and lovely little book with the tender touch of one who loves children and animals."
The cat, Jenny, known to those who read The Cat Club and The School for Cats goes on a night's carousal in search of a party, with her friends, Pickles and Florio. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JENNY AND THE CAT CLUB by Esther Averill
Released: March 28, 1973

"Complete with the original illustrations and a testimonial from Ms. Averill that 'Jenny was real — a very real cat."
Five of Jenny Linsky's early adventures — beginning with her first encounter with "The Cat Club" and later her "First Party," her "Adopted Brothers," and "How The Brothers Joined The Cat Club." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JENNY GOES TO SEA by Esther Averill
Released: Oct. 16, 1957

"But gallant Jenny manned the gangplank to delay sailing time until his return."
Fans who have followed the adventures of Jenny the cat should like this tale of feline foibles and fortitude. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JENNY'S MOONLIGHT ADVENTURE by Esther Averill
Released: June 15, 1949

"Vocabulary and type for second and third year readers."
I think these books about Jenny, the black Greenwich Village cat are delightful, and the fourth in the series which started with The Cat Club is again good fantasy, and an amusing story of how timid Jenny found she had courage to help a friend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SCHOOL FOR CATS by Esther Averill
Released: Aug. 20, 1947

"Easily soiled yellow jacket."
Another in the shy Jenny Linsky cat stories, as that plaintive little creature goes to a cat school in the country far from home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOTEL CAT by Esther Averill
Released: Nov. 26, 1969

"Quite up to scratch—no one could reasonably find 'fault with the services of the Hotel Cat."
Like the Royal Hotel where Tom finds refuge and rises to eminence, this has a certain musty sweetness—it's cheering to find that the members of The Cat Club (founded 1944), "forever friends," are forever true to character. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JENNY'S BEDSIDE BOOK by Esther Averill
Released: Sept. 2, 1959

"An ideal bedside reading book, Jenny will again claim ardent enthusiasts, both as a very remarkable cat and as the favorite feline of almost any little girl."
Once again Jenny Linsky proves herself to be a cat of high degree. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JENNY'S BIRTHDAY BOOK by Esther Averill
Released: Aug. 25, 1954

"Large type."
Flossily packaged department of utter nonsense (for a somewhat younger crowd) as Esther Averill writes and pictures another story of her famous feline brainchild Jenny Linsky (see The Cat Club, Jenny's Adopted Brothers etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 2, 1953

"Complete with the author's ever humorous drawings of the stiff legged cats and their cronies."
Another thriller for Jenny Linsky's fans has all the stealth, melodrama, virtue and bravado that so endeared books like The Cat Club and Jenny's Adopted Brothers, Jenny's moral rectitude wins a victory over her esoteric leanings when she decides Edward and Checkers, her recently adopted brothers, should have the opportunity to prove themselves for membership in the rather exclusive Cat Club. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 4, 1944

"Jack Ninepins should be a good companion to Punch and Pinocohic."
Again a book that — from vocabulary angle — would be difficult to read to themselves, but which this 6-9 age group would like read aloud, and the enchanting three color illustrations would make even younger children want to hear the story about the ninopin that was thrown into New York Harbor by the charwoman and of how he got back again to the nursery across the sea. Read full book review >