Search Results: "Eugene S. Morton"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 18, 1992

"A neat Darwinian approach that is sure to arouse controversy. (Four line drawings.)"
Morton (Research Zoologist/National Zoological Park, Washington, D.C.) and Page (former science editor of Smithsonian) tell it like they think it is when it comes to animal and human talk. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 16, 2012

"This otherworldly blog-novel will appeal to only the most adventurous readers."
A relentless, bizarre phantasmagoria rattled off in a series of bloglike episodes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DISTANT HOURS by Kate Morton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 9, 2010

"After a lengthy buildup, which doggedly connects all the characters, however peripheral, there's a rewarding, bittersweet payoff in the author's most gothic tale yet."
A letter points the way to a castle in Kent, which harbors decades of grim secrets, in Morton's latest (The House at Riverton, 2008, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NO. 2 FELINE DETECTIVE AGENCY by Mandy Morton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 28, 2017

"The mystery is gossamer-thin, the detective work modest, the characterization ditto, and the puns—well, you already know how you feel about them. But everyone who suspects that cats have always run the world will be at least a bit curious about how that works out in an alternate reality."
Tired of watching Lilian Jackson Braun's Koko and Yum Yum get upstaged by that do-nothing Jim Qwilleran? Wish the sleuthing pets in Rita Mae Brown's tales had even more prominent roles? Morton's debut, featuring an all-feline cast running amok in something like modern England, is the answer to your prayers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Not for beginners, who will find William Sheehan's The Planet Mars (1996) a better place to start. But for enthusiasts: this will be the Mars book of the year."
English science journalist Morton reconstitutes the Mars myth for the Net generation, showing how our mapping of the Martian landscape has brought into focus the "blotchy but beckoning" planet observed by 19th-century astronomers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WINDOW ACROSS THE RIVER by Brian Morton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"A modest tale of quiet sincerity, good-natured and freshly narrated, but it needs more bite than Morton's dull characters can provide."
Morton (Starting Out in the Evening, 1998, etc.) describes the complicated emotional life of a writer who cannot resist putting her friends into her stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

17 CARNATIONS by Andrew Morton
NON-FICTION
Released: March 10, 2015

"Morton insists that Edward never really wanted to be king and implies that Simpson never wanted to marry him. A better book would begin in Spain and focus on the damning papers, saving readers all the silly bits and innuendo of Simpson's affairs."
Morton (William & Catherine: Their Story, 2011, etc.) takes a break from his unauthorized biographies of the rich and famous to dig into the archives regarding the incompetent King Edward VIII and his American wife, Wallis Simpson.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPRING HARE by Eugene Yelchin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"A celebration of the heights of imagination as the eponymous spring hare lives up (and up and up) to its name. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A bright-eyed, tawny hare joins a red-haired, fair-skinned child on a high-flying adventure in Yelchin's first wordless picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HAUNTING OF FALCON HOUSE by Eugene Yelchin
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 14, 2016

"Eerie and effective. (Historical fantasy. 9-13)"
A "found" Russian manuscript recounts a late-19th-century haunting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARCADY'S GOAL by Eugene Yelchin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"An uplifting, believable ending makes this companion lighter—but no less affecting—than its laurelled predecessor. (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
Two survivors of Stalinist oppression attempt to form a family in this companion (not sequel) to the 2012 Newbery Honor-winning Breaking Stalin's Nose. Read full book review >