Search Results: "Eugene W. Field"


BOOK REVIEW

WYNKEN, BLYNKEN, AND NOD by Eugene W. Field
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 13, 2008

"The hand-lettered text and mixed-media illustrations rendered in nighttime blues and greens lend an imaginative, dream-like quality to the ethereal text. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Field's 19th-century poem, originally entitled "Dutch Lullaby," serves as the vehicle for this visual exegesis of the celestial text. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WYNKEN, BLYNKEN, AND NOD by Eugene W. Field
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2004

"Absolutely lovely. (Picture book. 3-6)"
In a fresh visual interpretation of this classic, McPhail infuses the text with a vitality extending and enriching the familiar lullaby. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINKEN, BLINKEN AND NOD by Robin Rosenthal
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 22, 2011

"Speech-recognition software is just not there yet in this pretty-but-glitchy app. (iPad storybook app. 2-6)"
What might have been a daring choice—instead of traditional narration, word highlighting is triggered by a reader's voice—sinks this otherwise-attractive adaptation of the classic poem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TWENTY-SIX MINUTES PLUS TWO by Eugene W. Carr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 30, 2014

"An unusual, if sometimes unclear, story collection with an intriguing premise."
A book of related short stories that examine the themes of fate and the consequences of small actions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 5, 1993

"Hickok and McDowell won't convince believers in an activist judiciary, but they do make clear the dangers to democracy posed by rule by judicial decree."
A powerful and profound ``look into the nature and extent of judicial power under a written constitution of limited powers.'' Hickok (Law/Dickinson College) and McDowell (Visiting Scholar/Harvard Law School; Curbing the Courts, 1988, etc.—not reviewed) see modern federal litigation as a tool used by ideologically motivated litigants ``to supplant the status quo with new visions of the just society.'' Thus, federal courts have departed from their role as neutral arbiters of specific cases and controversies and have become ``places where abstract legal theories are pushed by this side and that.'' The authors begin by analyzing a 1989 Supreme Court case, DeShaney v. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MICHAEL TWITTY
by Gregory McNamee

Recipes, like people, have DNA. It may take some ferreting out, some hard kitchen testing, some documentary research, and some more tasting and adjusting, but eventually that yellowed slip of paper tucked into grandmom’s copy of Joy of Cooking will yield its ancestry, reveal its origins through the patina of the past, and show how tastes and ingredients have changed ...


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BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"A feast for readers looking to taste the luxurious lifestyle of the English upper crust."
Field's debut historical novel takes a look at upper-class life in 18th-century England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CELEBRATING ITALY by Carol Field
Released: Dec. 7, 1990

This celebration of Italian celebrations, or feste, by the author of the highly regarded The Italian Baker (1985), is part cultural/folkloric/gastonomic travelogue, part cookbook composed of recipes scaled down from the massive quantities of special foods prepared for the occasions. Read full book review >