Search Results: "Evelyn Daviddi"


BOOK REVIEW

I LOVE CHOCOLATE by Davide Cali
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 10, 2009

"The colors are gorgeous and, appropriately, are reminiscent of a Wayne Thiebaud cupcake—chocolate, of course. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Let us stuff our caloric worries away and now praise, in read-aloud voice, chocolate—that giver of happiness and succor and stomachaches. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"A slice-of-life from a small-town existence."
In a collection of columns from The Easley Progress, McCollum (Nalley, A Southern Family Story, 2002) offers mostly heartwarming tales of her family and the hamlet in which she grew up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DOLL'S HOUSE by Evelyn Anthony
Released: Aug. 3, 1992

"Seamlessly styled entertainment—with tight action and a wry, ironic close."
Again, Anthony (The Relic, 1991, etc. etc.) melds romantic suspense and espionage thrills for a spirited diversion—this time involving a love affair that bobs crazily around a plot to rub out an Arab prince. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUNAWAY by Evelyn Lau
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Outspoken but without insight, naive but capable of inflicting great pain: Lau's adolescent reflections aredespite their shock valueno more than that."
Sex, drugs, and an obsession with ``my writing'' dominate this self-absorbed journal of a nonetheless remarkable teenager. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DIARIES OF EVELYN WAUGH by Evelyn Waugh
Released: Oct. 25, 1977

All different kinds of people are going to be disappointed by these heavily heralded diaries—kept by England's most acerbic schoolboy, playboy, traveler, soldier, and novelist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELENA by Evelyn Waugh
Released: Oct. 16, 1950

"An intellectual invention which is not without its spiritual significance, this still does not subdue the occasional bright badinage, the wit which is a worldly one, although it will be the name that will carry this to its audience."
A retelling of the story of St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"A nice grrrl, but not much of a riot."
A rock 'n' roll girl embraces motherhood, pens self-indulgent memoir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOVED ONE by Evelyn Waugh
Released: June 23, 1948

"Certainly not a even for Waugh addicts."
Entertaining as Evelyn Waugh's practiced wit may be, the mockery here seems a little macabre for all tastes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWORD OF HONOUR by Evelyn Waugh
Released: Nov. 2, 1966

"Some critics, Malcolm Muggeridge for instance, considered this ironic, absurd, affecting (and autobiographical) portrait of a middle aged man at war his finest achievement."
Both a "recension" (Waugh before his death excised some of the original material) as well as a one-volume publication of the World War II trilogy— Men at Arms (1952) Officers and Gentleman (1955) and Unconditional Surrender (1961) which Waugh thought of as "obituary of the Roman Catholic Church in England." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TETON SIOUX by Evelyn Wolfson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"List of important dates; glossary; excellent bibliography and index. (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
A brisk but thorough and informative history of the Lakota (Teton Sioux), with a glance at the present: How they got to the Great Plains, life before and after the advent of horses, and various ceremonies (though the deep religious motivation characteristic of these people is not conveyed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 1993

"List of organizations; glossary; index. (Nonfiction. 9- 12)"
First in ``The Great Naturalists'' series: a portrait of a woman who has been observing Borneo's orangutans and championing their preservation since 1971. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RONALD KNOX by Evelyn Waugh
Released: June 15, 1959

"He does more than record his subject's exterior life; he provides a record of a lost era — which World War I changed forever."
Although this biography was respectfully reviewed when it was first published in England — due, one suspects, as much to its author as to its subject — it was apparent that, for his countrymen, Ronald Knox, the man, remains essentially remote. Read full book review >