Search Results: "Evelyn Waugh"


BOOK REVIEW

THE DIARIES OF EVELYN WAUGH by Evelyn Waugh
Released: Oct. 25, 1977

All different kinds of people are going to be disappointed by these heavily heralded diaries—kept by England's most acerbic schoolboy, playboy, traveler, soldier, and novelist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 22, 1936

"It is witty — and biting — and good reading."
This is a limited — 700 copies for sale — and I should think these would be quickly disposed of. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 15, 1957

"A rather macabre fancy, curiosity- along with the expected cleverness of phrase- combine to make a small diversion of delusion; it is not, however, Waugh at his strongest-or his best."
The bizarre experiences which overtake and almost overcome Gilbert Pinfold, a successful British novelist of fifty years, form a slight novel- which is also something of a literary vagary for Evelyn Waugh. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1935

"It will undoubtedly be overlooked by many Waugh admirers if it is not there, and by Catholic and Protestant alike who enjoy a treat."
The Waughs have a way with them that would intrigue and enchant any modern, but Edmund Campion, Elizabeth's Martyr-Saint would do a proper job even though painted by a brush lacking Waugh's natural flair. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDMUND CAMPION by Evelyn Waugh
Released: June 19, 1946

"Biography in the classical tradition and in the pure prose associated with Waugh, this will have a devotional appeal as well as an intellectual interest, but is not for the wider market of his last."
A biography of Edmund Campion, the gentle scholar- who was forced by the bigotry and persecution of the Elizabethan age into a world of violence, which offers a reverential portrayal, assured scholarship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRIDESHEAD REVISITED by Evelyn Waugh
Released: Jan. 2, 1945

"EWSLUGBOM for January."
Here's perhaps the first chance we have had to make Waugh an item for big sales. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RONALD KNOX by Evelyn Waugh
Released: June 15, 1959

"He does more than record his subject's exterior life; he provides a record of a lost era — which World War I changed forever."
Although this biography was respectfully reviewed when it was first published in England — due, one suspects, as much to its author as to its subject — it was apparent that, for his countrymen, Ronald Knox, the man, remains essentially remote. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1984

"But connoisseurs of the graver Waugh styles will find stretches of elegant prose in every decade; and Gallagher's extensive introductory material (plus a ten-page list of the articles not included here) helps to make this a substantial addition to the Waughreference shelf."
More for Waugh scholars than for admirers of his fiction, this massive volume brings together nearly 50 years of book-reviews, newspaper columns, letters-to-the-editor, and essays. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOVED ONE by Evelyn Waugh
Released: June 23, 1948

"Certainly not a even for Waugh addicts."
Entertaining as Evelyn Waugh's practiced wit may be, the mockery here seems a little macabre for all tastes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELENA by Evelyn Waugh
Released: Oct. 16, 1950

"An intellectual invention which is not without its spiritual significance, this still does not subdue the occasional bright badinage, the wit which is a worldly one, although it will be the name that will carry this to its audience."
A retelling of the story of St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWORD OF HONOUR by Evelyn Waugh
Released: Nov. 2, 1966

"Some critics, Malcolm Muggeridge for instance, considered this ironic, absurd, affecting (and autobiographical) portrait of a middle aged man at war his finest achievement."
Both a "recension" (Waugh before his death excised some of the original material) as well as a one-volume publication of the World War II trilogy— Men at Arms (1952) Officers and Gentleman (1955) and Unconditional Surrender (1961) which Waugh thought of as "obituary of the Roman Catholic Church in England." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OFFICERS AND GENTLEMEN by Evelyn Waugh
Released: July 7, 1955

"From the first book which had a glowing press- but a perhaps less impressive response- you can best determine your market here which will be at an intellectual rather than popular level."
The second part of the trilogy which began with Men At Arms (1952) continues the leisurely perspective of World War II, and while the narrative itself is perhaps a fitful one- it is animated not only by the splendid display of its satiric invention- but also by its compassionate concern. Read full book review >