Search Results: "Fanny"


BOOK REVIEW

INDIVISIBLE by Fanny Howe
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"A badly muddled novel of ideas that goes nowhere at some length."
Howe's latest (after Saving History, 1993, etc.), another in the Native Agents series ("new American writings in the mostly-female first-person that turns a public ‘I' out onto the world"): here, middle-aged narrator Henny has locked her husband McCool in a closet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAVING HISTORY by Fanny Howe
Released: June 1, 1993

"Provocative subject but ultimately too disjointed, as ideas and insights proliferate without any coherent connection."
As usual from Howe (Famous Questions, 1989; The Deep North, 1988, etc.), a brilliant, often lyrical novel driven by a strong moral imperative in a gritty, surreal setting—but ultimately overwhelmed by a narrative that tries to hard, and ends too easily. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIFTY SHAMES OF EARL GREY by Fanny Merkin
Released: July 31, 2012

"Anna may learn to laugh with, instead of at, Grey, but the constant lampooning leaves the reader numb."
Can a young, preternaturally successful corporate executive overcome his 50 shameful secrets to find true love? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEÑORA HONEYCOMB by Fanny Buitrago
Released: Feb. 28, 1996

"Vivaciously translated, Buitrago's novel occasionally veers into bad taste, but this sassy, lighthearted romp is well worth reading: a celebration of love and lust, innocence and sensuality, from a colorful, powerfully female perspective."
Colombian author Buitrago's second novel—her first to be published in translation—is a bawdy, hilarious soap opera of unrequited love and the magical power of sexuality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SELECTED POEMS by Fanny Howe
Released: April 1, 2000

"Howe's poetry is fabricated from questions rather than certainties and arises, like the revelations of more conventional mystics, from contemplation in solitude."
Howe is the author of more than 20 books, encompassing both fiction and poetry, most of which have been published by small presses (the most recent in 1997). This marks her first collection of Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEEDLE'S EYE by Fanny Howe
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A slim volume that roams across continents, genres, and centuries to convey that which is so difficult to express."
An allusive and elusive collection of meditations on being and becoming, rites of passage, boys and the men they become. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UP DOG by Hazel Hutchins
by Hazel Hutchins, illustrated by Fanny
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2012

"This little pooch's up-and-down antics charm. (Board book. 18 mos.-3)"
Though he earns a stint in the doghouse, this little dog is one endearing pet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. FINE, PORCUPINE by Fanny Joly
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Vignettes and design details abound, so there is always something to look at, even when the text and its free-spirited rhymes begin to grow heavy. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The sweet sentiments of this tale are sharpened by the prickly quills of a porcupine. Mr. Fine knows how hard it is to be spikey; people ``holler'' and ``scream'' when he rides into town on his ten-speed bike because, as he puts it, ``My hair was a problem.'' He covers his quills, decorates them, but nothing helps until he meets someone special: ``I was not the only one in the world who looked like I do! . . . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JANE, THE FOX, AND ME by Fanny Britt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"A sensitive and possibly reassuring take on a psychological vulnerability that is all too common and not easily defended. (Graphic novel. 10-13)"
Lonely young Hélène begins to get out from under her body-image issue with help from a new friend—and Jane Eyre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS UNDERCOVER by Fanny Britt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 3, 2017

"An unflinching, delicate portrait of a boy and his broken family. (Graphic novel. 10-14)"
As his family falls apart, a young teen boy struggles to approach the girl he admires from afar. Read full book review >