Search Results: "Frances Park"


BOOK REVIEW

HOTLINE HEAVEN by Frances Park
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1998

"Park strives for lyricism in depicting the lives of this more-or-less average small-town couple, but too often her prose dissolves into sentimental murk."
Lumpish fiction debut by the owner of a D.C. chocolate shop detailing the lives of a middle-aged couple who meet via a suicide prevention hotline and continue to struggle against a nagging desire to end it all. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2011

"Smooth, soft-centered confection that goes down with a smile."
Two Washington, D.C., siblings, disillusioned with life and love, join forces to realize a sweetly successful venture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOOD-BYE, 382 SHIN DANG DONG by Frances Park
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"A gentle and loving story perfectly pitched to its audience. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Though the subject of moving day is a popular theme, the Parks (Where on Earth is My Bagel, 2001, etc.) provide a unique perspective on the experience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HAVE A GOOD DAY CAFE by Frances Park
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"A sensitive and inspiring portrait of a family's triumph in the face of adversity. (Picture book. 6-9)"
An immigrant family adapts to life in America in this engaging look at their experience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Despite the devastating ending, this touching tale of quiet bravery has universal appeal. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The phenomenal but often unnoticed heroism of many recent immigrants' journeys to freedom is recorded in this remarkable tale of a young Korean girl's escape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE ON EARTH IS MY BAGEL? by Frances Park
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2001

"Lin's transporting artwork has a toned-down Eastern flavor that makes for a successful expression of the story's trans-cultural happening, but it is the pursuit of passion—and the warm rewards that may follow on its wake—that makes this story special. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The fates look kindly upon the mixture of longing, serendipity, and quick thinking that accompanies the Parks' story of Yum Yung's bagel desire. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

FRANCES FITZGERALD
by Gregory McNamee

A century ago, if you had said that evangelical Christianity would one day emerge as a leading political force in America, you might have met incredulity or even ridicule. Such belief was widely seen as a throwback to the old days of snake handling and speaking in tongues. Didn’t Clarence Darrow prove definitively, after all, in a Tennessee courtroom that ...


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BLOG POST

FAVORITES OF 2016 - PART TWO
by Leila Roy

Last week, I started my annual roundup of favorite books of the year with my standout reads from January to March.

Today, I’ll be looking at April through June.

Let’s jump right in!

April: The Lie Tree, by Frances Hardinge

While I don’t know if I’ve ever been able to name a NUMBER ONE FAVORITE BOOK of any given year ...


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BLOG POST

NEW BOOKS I'M WATCHING FOR IN MAY 2017
by Leila Roy

Last week, I covered a few of the May YA romances I’m excited about—and last month, I covered Riley Redgate’s Noteworthy—but there are even MORE May books that I’m looking forward to!

Here are thirteen of them:

It's Not Like It's a Secret, by Misa Sugiura

Lots of things change for sixteen-year-old Sana Kiyohara when her father ...


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BOOK REVIEW

FIRST SNOW by Bomi Park
by Bomi Park, illustrated by Bomi Park
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Readers will find themselves longing for the season's first snow, too. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A little Korean child celebrates the titular first snow. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MICK HARTE WAS HERE by Barbara Park
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 20, 1995

"By the end of the book, readers miss him, too. (Fiction. 8-12)"
It's always difficult reading about the death of a child, especially when he's ``one of the neatest kids you'd ever want to meet.'' That's how Phoebe Harte, 13, describes her slightly younger brother Mick, in a poignant story by a writer more associated with making readers laugh (Maxie, Rosie, and Earl—Partners in Grime, 1990, etc.) than cry. Read full book review >