Search Results: "Frances Stonor Saunders"


BOOK REVIEW

THE WOMAN WHO SHOT MUSSOLINI by Frances Stonor Saunders
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2010

"A thorough, well-written biography of an enigmatic figure."
The story of the little-known Violet Gibson (1876-1956), who shot Italian ruler Benito Mussolini on April 7, 1926, but failed in her assassination attempt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 4, 2000

"An illuminating investigation that will surprise general readers and aid scholars and students."
An impressively detailed, eye-opening study by film producer Saunders of the CIA's clandestine sponsorship of artists and intellectuals during the Cold War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2005

"Commanding, skillful, effervescent."
Saunders (The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters, 2000) has found a fascinating tale, as rich and complex as a tapestry. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

GEORGE SAUNDERS
by David L. Ulin

George Saunders never meant to write a novel. Or maybe he had come to a certain acceptance about his work. “I had gotten to the place,” he admits, over the phone from Santa Cruz, California, where he is on book tour, “where I was all right with not writing a novel. You know, me and Alice Munro: we don’t ...


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BOOK REVIEW

SNOWTIME by Dave Saunders
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 30, 1991

"The slight story lacks structure, but the energetically composed paintings of the ducks in the snow are vibrant and amusing. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Dibble and Dabble, introduced in an eponymously titled book (1990), return in a second simple story. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

FRANCES FITZGERALD
by Gregory McNamee

A century ago, if you had said that evangelical Christianity would one day emerge as a leading political force in America, you might have met incredulity or even ridicule. Such belief was widely seen as a throwback to the old days of snake handling and speaking in tongues. Didn’t Clarence Darrow prove definitively, after all, in a Tennessee courtroom that ...


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BOOK REVIEW

OLIVE MARSHMALLOW by Katie Saunders
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 3, 2015

"Well-done new sibling books are always welcome, and this one is as cozy as being swaddled. (Picture book.2-4)"
Another new-baby story joins the cribfull of titles told from the big-sibling angle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIVE CHILDREN ON THE WESTERN FRONT by Kate Saunders
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Readers familiar with the classic will probably be dissatisfied with this vision of it; readers unfamiliar with it will be mystified. (Historical fantasy. 8-12)"
Six characters from a classic work of light British fantasy are resurrected, then two of them are sent to the trenches of World War I. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BACHELOR BOYS by Kate Saunders
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"London lovers and happy families unite in this satisfying and touching work."
Engaging, witty fare, Saunders's novel of matchmaking gone awry (think modern-day Emma) is smart fiction masquerading as a light summer read. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PASTORALIA by George Saunders
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 8, 2000

"Being inside the teeming heads of these folks is amusing and enlightening. So accurately are they rendered, in all their flawed glory, that they appear not only perfectly human but familiar."
The freakish, cowed characters filling Saunders's acclaimed debut, CivilWarLand in Bad Decline (1995), have spawned a new crop of unhappy, scabrously comic campers in these six stories, as the struggle among them to be happy and do the right thing continues. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN PERSUASION NATION by George Saunders
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2006

"Many readers will be glad that they don't live in Persuasion Nation, though the most perceptive will recognize that we already do."
Within this series of thematically linked stories, consumerism goes haywire in a country and era somewhat like our own. Read full book review >