Search Results: "Frances Watts"


BOOK REVIEW

FRANCES DANCES by Ilene Cooper
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 3, 1991

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 9-11)"
An entry in the ``Frances in the Fourth Grade'' series, which begins in a companion volume when the heroine's best friend moves away in Frances Takes a Chance (also 7/3/91). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"Like pirate radio itself: worth tuning in to, but in the end the signal's too weak."
A journalist looks back on her adventures in the outlaw world of low-power radio during the '90s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET OF THE GINGER MICE by Frances Watts
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2012

"These latest mouse heroes promise more ripping, gripping mystery and adventure. (map) (Fantasy. 8-12)"
In this first book of The Song of the Winns trilogy, mouse siblings try to rescue their missing brother and become perilously embroiled in political intrigue involving ginger mice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SPIES OF GERANDER by Frances Watts
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2013

"An animated sequel that does not disappoint. (map) (Animal fantasy. 8-12)"
Four stalwart mice return in this second book of The Song of the Winns, risking their lives as spies to help liberate Gerander from oppressive neighboring Souris. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MIDDLE SHEEP by Frances Watts
ADVENTURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2010

"Sibling conflict, animals and superheroes are all high on the interest level of young readers, making this a series to watch. (Fiction. 7-9)"
Oh, the curse of being the only child—not adorable like the baby and not smart like the older sibling! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRANCES AND BERNARD by Carlene Bauer
Released: Feb. 5, 2013

"Disappointing."
Debut novelist Bauer pens an epistolary novel whose protagonists lead insular, self-absorbed and very dull lives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WONDERFUL TOWERS OF WATTS by Patricia Zelver
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1994

"The book is sure to engender interest in his achievement. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 5-10)"
How the Italian immigrant Simon Rodia spent decades building the renowned towers next to his bungalow in ``a poor neighborhood that was half town, half country, outside the city limits of Los Angeles.'' The employee of a tile company, ``Old Sam'' used broken tile and bottles, mirrors, shells, and a miscellany of found objects to surface fantastical shapes, ``a lacy web of steel, covered with a skin of concrete.'' Though her simple narrative is short on such specifics as dates, Zelver conveys the wonder and mystery of his long labors, concluded at the age of 80. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Dec. 15, 2006

"Young readers will find the scope of change Perkins affected to be breathtaking, even her lifelong battle simply to keep her birth name rather than take her husband's. (timeline, notes, bibliography, index) (Biography. 9-14)"
Unemployment insurance, Social Security, workers' compensation, minimum wage—all required a fight before implementation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 23, 1963

"Frances pulls all the faces that ever occurred to silent screen ingenues as well as a few that they never thought of. Her last face has both eyes closed in sleep. Rhymed and illustrated with humor that will appeal to an audience that retired with reluctance before 8 P.M."
On one page a text in rhyme and facing that is the illustration of the action the rhyme describes captioned with the demand "YOU DO IT!" Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEDTIME FOR FRANCES by Garth Williams
Released: May 11, 1960

"In any case, here's a book that will be surely popular."
Frances is a lively, imaginative and appealing small badger. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIGURING OUT FRANCES by Gina Willner-Pardo
Released: Sept. 20, 1999

"Most readers will be gratified by the genuinely moving ending. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Abigail has been looking forward to having her best friend, Travis, attend her school, and is devastated when the fifth grade boy doesn't want to be associated with her, a fourth grader, during school hours. Read full book review >