Search Results: "Francesca Chessa"


BOOK REVIEW

THE MYSTERIOUS PACKAGE by Francesca Chessa
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2007

"Deeply textured and richly colored, they capture the flavors and resiliency of childhood daydreams and imbue the world of Charlie and Frances with an endearing simplicity. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Chessa tells a simple story of two children, Charlie and Frances, whose parents have received a large package in the mail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOLLY’S RED BOOTS by Francesca Chessa
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"The seamless combination of art and text will be rollicking fun for young readers. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Holly wants to make a snowman, but cannot find her red boots to keep her feet dry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELLIOT'S ARCTIC SURPRISE by Catherine Barr
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"A thoughtful story with a highly unusual take on Santa as a larger-than-life character, for environmentally minded households. (Picture book. 3-6)"
While enjoying a beach vacation with his parents, redheaded Elliot finds a bottle with a note inside from Santa asking for help from children to save the Arctic, Santa's home at the North Pole, and the Christmas holiday. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABY BABY BLAH BLAH BLAH! by Jonathan Shipton
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2009

"One baby's a handful, but two may be double trouble. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Emily has a serious case of the baby blues. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVE-A-DUCK by Alan James Brown
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2010

"Her cheery, inviting paintings are the just-right complement to this quirky tale. (Picture book. 3-7)"
This affable tale chronicles the adventures of a rubber duck on the loose, with Brown impishly recounting the story from the faux fowl's point of view. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIBRARY LILY by Gillian Shields
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 8, 2011

"Shields stops short of preaching, but it is 'the choir' who will most appreciate the message. (Picture book. 4-7)"
This gentle read presents a rosy-cheeked child, brand-new library card in hand, dazzled by the array of choices surrounding her on the shelves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CYRIL THE MANDRILL by Francesca Greco
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 15, 2005

"No replacement for the classic, but an acceptable alternative and a small lesson in acceptance of those who are different. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Greco switches species and locale on Leo Lionni's Frederick (1967), but keeps the basic plot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLEVER TORTOISE by Francesca Martin
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Utterly charming and a great read-aloud. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Martin (The Honey Hunters, 1992, etc.) retells an old, old trickster story from the Ngoni people of southern Tanzania with great good humor and a story-teller style highly appropriate for a tale from the oral tradition: "Listen! / There is a lake in Africa, called Nyasa. / Mmm, it is full of blue cool water." and "Hm, tch, tch, it started like this . . ." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JOURNEY by Francesca Sanna
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A necessary, artful, and searing story. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-12)"
A timely, powerful picture book about refugees. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"A satisfying cumulative tale, handsomely presented. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
``Cheka, cheka, che!'' cries the honey guide. ``If you want honey, follow me!'' First a boy joins the little bird, then—one by one—a crowd of animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PERSONAL EFFECTS by Francesca Duranti
Released: March 1, 1993

"Disappointing."
Hunting for literary treasure is again the subject of a Duranti novel; in The House on Moon Lake (1986), this Italian author's debut, the quarry was a lost masterpiece; in her slim third novel, it's an elusive Eastern European writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RULES OF THE WILD by Francesca Marciano
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Idiotic, hackneyed, unbearably pretentious: Marciano's portraits of female vanity and masculine self-absorption would provide the makings of a satire worthy of Waugh—were there even the slightest curl of a smile on her lips. (First printing of 50,000; author tour)"
A debut that takes us into an Africa where—with Marciano as our guide—we are more likely to come upon Bianca Jagger than Nelson Mandela. Read full book review >