Search Results: "Francesca Delbanco"


BOOK REVIEW

ASK ME ANYTHING by Francesca Delbanco
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"Trite, plotless, self-absorbed debut from a former writer of Seventeen's advice column."
Good advice, bad advice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POSSESSION by Nicholas Delbanco
Released: Feb. 11, 1976

"These give the novel its strength and austerity even if it's as claustral as an hour spent in a root cellar."
Delbanco goes on writing his perhaps thanklessly individualistic books, which are not so much private as confined. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FATHERING by Nicholas Delbanco
Released: Dec. 7, 1973

"Robert's estranged and vague and footless years of wandering are indeed justified although by the close (Elizabeth commits suicide; Hans dies; Alexander shoots himself but only succeeds in losing his sight; etc., etc.) all these 'linkages' and 'couplings' will not have corroborated his 'provenance' or restored his real and psychic identity, both a word and a concern which have become the cliche of our time."
Even if Mr. Delbanco has abandoned some of his most capricious stylistic tics, Fathering is still pretty heavy weathering and the occasional word remains "echoic" of perhaps Durrell, not so much in the shifting perspectives — there's that — but in the truly pate de foie gras prose. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLLEGE by Andrew Delbanco
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2012

"Although stronger on diagnosis than cure, this is an impassioned call for a corrupt system to heal itself."
Has the democratic ideal of a classical education, open to rich and poor alike, become a thing of the past? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 11, 1989

"The metaphor of the writer writing can wear thin, but, still, this is a solid—if specialized—collection about the disillusions and small epiphanies of the literary life."
Delbanco, author of the Sherbrookes trilogy (Possession, Sherbrookes, Stillness), here offers a second collection of intelligent but surfacey stories (About My Table, 1983), all concerning writers (mostly male) who must accommodate their illusions to reality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMALL RAIN by Nicholas Delbanco
Released: March 10, 1975

"The book with its high-toned blat is also just that kind of experience."
After Fathering, Delbanco's only accessible novel, Small Rain's a steady drizzle of raffine exchanges (French, German, Italian and Latin on every other page), recondite vocabulary stretchers ("He permitted the oxymoronic construction; he used the chiasma in speech"), not so recondite aesthetic referrals (the Brownings, Buddenbrooks) and a little name-dropping of fine foods and wines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLD SCORES by Nicholas Delbanco
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 22, 1997

"A moving exploration of a believably passionate love, and of its subtle, powerful, persistent impact on the lives of two stubborn romantics."
A sad, convincing, autumnal tale of love lost, found, and lost again, by old pro Delbanco (In the Name of Mercy, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEWS by Nicholas Delbanco
Released: May 12, 1970

As far as general readability is concerned Mr. Delbanco's tangled fabrications have been downhill racing all the way since his first successful The Martlet's Tale (1966) and this one's another irritating mix of strangulated vision and alluvial prose. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEAUX ARTS TRIO by Nicholas Delbanco
Released: Jan. 23, 1984

"684), this uninspired mosaic provides neither rich character-studies nor involving vignettes."
Because author Delbanco is a novelist (Sherbrookes) and the son-in-law of Beaux Arts Trio cellist Bernard Greenhouse, you might expect this treatment to have more texture than the routine, patchwork artist-profile book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STILLNESS by Nicholas Delbanco
Released: Sept. 12, 1980

"Required reading, of course, for those who enjoyed the previous two volumes (and Delbanco does a firm job of closing out the trilogy for them), but the author seems understandably eager to wrap up and move on—perhaps to richer, livelier material."
The final book of Delbanco's trilogy (Possession, Sherbrookes) about the odd-fated Vermont manorial family, the Sherbrookes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

In a brilliant review of how American writers of the last two centuries have confronted evil by depicting it, Delbanco (Humanities/Columbia Univ.; The Puritan Ordeal, not reviewed) suggests that our postmodern inability to name evil puts us in danger of being dominated by it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2005

"A Guide Bleu for the literary armchair."
A delightfully aimless, somewhat rueful collection of nine essays on places visited and friends lost. Read full book review >