Search Results: "Francis Fukuyama"


BOOK REVIEW

THE END OF HISTORY AND THE LAST MAN by Francis Fukuyama
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 22, 1992

"An important work that affords significant returns on the investments of time and attention required to get the most from its elegantly structured theme."
In 1989, The National Interest published "The End of History?" by Fukuyama, then a senior official at the State Department. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1999

"A disappointing effort that, for all its detail, says very little."
Technological and economic progress meet social decay in this ambitious book that promises more than it delivers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"Many won't buy the human dignity thesis or dystopian nightmares, but credit the author for laying out how we got to this pass and why we need to act."
To clone or not to clone? asks social philosopher Fukuyama (The Great Disruption, 1999, etc.) in his latest disquisition on science and society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 14, 1995

"A challenging, elegant exegesis that puts intellectual meat on the bones of Benjamin Franklin's tip to his fellow revolutionaries at the signing of the Declaration of Independence: 'We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately.'"
Fukuyama offers a general theory of prosperity that provides provocative answers to certain of the questions he raised in The End of History and the Last Man (1992). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2014

"Systematic, thorough and even hopeful fodder for reform-minded political observers."
In his companion to The Origins of the Political Order, the deeply engaged political scientist offers a compelling historical overview of a useful template for the retooling of institutions in the modern state. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 19, 2011

"Endlessly interesting—reminiscent at turns of Oswald Spengler, Stanislaw Andreski and Samuel Huntington, though less pessimistic and much better written."
Sweeping, provocative big-picture study of humankind's political impulses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 13, 2002

"Full canvas as the blood flies."
Fourth or fifth "Return to Treasure Island" novel striving to re-create Stevenson's breezy blood-and-thunder in a new course on the old chart—and tempting the reader with leftover loot still awaiting its return to civilization. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LIAR’S DIARY by Patry Francis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"Psychologically interesting, but weakened by melodrama."
The unlikely friendship between a small-town school secretary and a flamboyant teacher proves deadly in this psychological murder mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2004

"'Where can we look for assurance that it's still the same reliably inevitable old world we loved to hate?' asked Russell Baker. Look no further."
In his controlled pyrotechnic against idiocy, Wheen (Karl Marx, 2001) trots forth its champions, from Deepak Chopra to Thomas Friedman, and douses them with flammable liquid. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLAY-RIDE by Dick Francis
Released: Feb. 2, 1973

"The story's sound and Mr. Francis keeps it moving and changing directions with his customized touch."
At the start it's to the races again — this time in Norway where a jockey is said to have disappeared with the day's turnstile take. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 15, 2013

"C.S. Lewis might not approve of the language, but he'd surely approve of the sentiment. A thought-provoking entertainment."
A highly personal—and unconventional—defense of belief in Christian doctrine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FORFEIT by Dick Francis
Released: Feb. 26, 1968

"And then there's the dusky beauty Gail who loves him, betrays him, in this multi-gaited thriller."
Reporter James Tyrone takes on an additional assignment in order to cover the expenses that help support his invalid wife. Read full book review >