Search Results: "Francis Knight"


BOOK REVIEW

LAST TO RISE by Francis Knight
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 26, 2013

"There's definitely something here, but it's not quite enough."
The Rojan Dizon trilogy (Before the Fall, 2013; Fade to Black, 2013) doggedly trudges to its brutally stark conclusion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FADE TO BLACK by Francis Knight
Released: Feb. 26, 2013

"Intensely realized and gripping, nonetheless: an auspicious inauguration."
Dark fantasy from England: Sussex resident Knight's debut and first of a series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMBERS & ECHOES by Karsten Knight
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Aug. 28, 2012

"Lust and violence make for a fast and entertaining read, but this could have been so much more. (Urban fantasy. 14 & up)"
Frenzied action and steamy romance aren't enough to ignite this overwrought sequel to Wildefire (2011). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILDEFIRE by Karsten Knight
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: July 26, 2011

"The Mighty Morphin Power Ranger ambiance and frenetically paced action scenes might have worked well in a graphic novel, but without art to supply missing emotion and nuance, the shallow, flat-footed prose, fueled by escalating violence, fails to engage. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
Perhaps inspired by Rick Riordan's phenomenal success, debut author Knight takes a more-must-be-better approach for this multiple-mythology mashup. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SIERRA CLUB BOOK OF SMALL MAMMALS by Linsay Knight
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1993

"How Scientists Group Mammals''; index. (Nonfiction. 9+)"
Like The Sierra Club Book of Great Mammals (1992), this falls somewhere between a reference and a browsing book, with dozens of meticulous color drawings and appealing photos of animals, informally grouped by family or characteristics—small marsupials, canids, rodents, etc.—and accompanied with brief technical descriptions of the classification of each, and short paragraphs on some representative species. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Pretty but marginal. (Nonfiction. 10+)"
Color photos and drawings make this survey—including brief discussions of what makes a mammal, early fossil mammals, endangered species, and examples of nine different orders— attractive for browsing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAVING WONDER by Mary Knight
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"A likable protagonist and good writing can't overcome the novel's problems. (Fiction. 8-12)"
It's been five years since 12-year-old Curley's mother and little brother drowned when a coal mine slurry pond broke its banks and swallowed them and seven years since his father died in a mining accident. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUMPTY DUMPTY by Damon Knight
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Weird, amusing, confusing, arresting, and yet the whole is disappointingly less that the sum of the myriad, often wonderful, parts."
Distinguished editor, writer, and critic Knight's new novel (after A Reasonable World, 1993, etc.) opens in Milan, where Wellington ``Bill'' Stout—he ``travels in ladies' underwear''—is shot in the head while dining in a restaurant. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 5, 2005

"For the time being, the definitive life of Nelson, though certain not to be the last word."
Even-keeled life of the British naval hero, who was famous in his time for two things: victory at sea, and a long-running affair with Lady Emma Hamilton, the wife of a British diplomat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPIES WITHOUT CLOAKS by Amy Knight
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1996

"Knight cannot avoid the difficulty inherent in her subject of having to draw conclusions from scanty evidence, but this is the most scholarly and dispassionate assessment yet available of a question critical to the future of Russia."
Persuasive evidence that Boris Yeltsin, since becoming president of Russia, may have found the KGB far too useful an organization to have tried seriously to constrain it. Read full book review >