Search Results: "Francis Spufford"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 15, 2013

"C.S. Lewis might not approve of the language, but he'd surely approve of the sentiment. A thought-provoking entertainment."
A highly personal—and unconventional—defense of belief in Christian doctrine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 8, 2002

"A brilliant personal view of why we read and why we should."
In his first book (I May Be Some Time, 1997), journalist Spufford won acclaim for examining the English imagination; now he illuminates his own with verve and intimacy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1997

"Spufford elegantly details how all these images, elements, and metaphors came home to roost in the Edwardian imagination, leading directly to parts unknown."
Spufford, of the Guardian in London, plumbs the cultural fascination and aesthetic attraction of cold regions for British explorers, and how their romance with snow was fashioned by an evolving national sensibility, in this smartly argued, wide-ranging book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRUE STORIES by Francis Spufford
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 3, 2017

"A bibliophagist snacks and dines, sharing with us some of the tastiest bits."
A longtime writer in a variety of genres presents a potpourri of pieces, arranged thematically, from the past few decades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOLDEN HILL by Francis Spufford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 27, 2017

"A first-rate entertainment with a rich historical feel and some delightful twists."
This sparkling first novel sends a young man through a gantlet of troubles and amusements in 18th-century Manhattan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 14, 2012

"A highly creative, illuminating, genre-resisting history."
The strange, sad, hilarious story of the Soviet Union's blind pursuit of a Communist paradise, told through a mix of history and fiction, using both to get to the truth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRANCIS DRAKE by John Cummins
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 5, 1996

"A scholarly but basically laudatory picture, nicely timed for the fourth centenary of Drake's death next year."
A graphic account of the man who, among other swashbuckling exploits, was the first to sail around the world and was largely responsible for saving England from invasion by the Spanish Armada. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POPE FRANCIS by Paul Vallely
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Discovering a pope with a controversial past and a revolutionary style of leadership in the present, Vallely provides a highly worthwhile resource for Catholics and non-Catholics alike."
An exhaustive look at the newest pope. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRANCIS CRICK by Matt Ridley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2006

"A well-written addition to the publisher's 'Eminent Lives' series."
Short biography of a giant in molecular biology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POPE FRANCIS by Beatrice Gormley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 26, 2017

"A serviceable biography that will serve the student who chooses Pope Francis as a subject well. (timeline, sources, photos) (Biography. 10-14)"
Pope Francis' life story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAINT FRANCIS by Brian Wildsmith
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"But the gilt-edged, stained- glass beauty of the pages is oddly out of keeping with the saint who called himself il poverello; the warm, down-to-earth humanity of Lewin's paintings suits his story better. (Picture book. 6+)"
An estimable work with two formidable competitors: Tomie dePaola's Francis: The Poor Man of Assisi (1982) and Margaret Hodges's Brother Francis and the Friendly Beasts (1991), illustrated by Ted Lewin. ``The Canticle of Brother Sun'' opens the book, and a recapitulation of the facts of Francis's life, with dates, closes it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRANCIS BACON by Michael Peppiatt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1997

"Peppiatt stalks and bags elusive prey: a better understanding of a disturbing body of work created by a man who lived inscrutably, in purposeful chaos. (illustrations, not seen)"
In his time, the late Francis Bacon was regarded both as England's ``most important living painter'' and as a ``cheap sensationalist.'' This excellent biography reveals a dramatic self- mythologizer who painted brilliantly enough to realize his self- cast, epic-tragic role. Read full book review >