Search Results: "Frank Wynne"


BOOK REVIEW

FRANK by James Kaplan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 2, 2010

"Ring-a-ding-ding!"
For better and worse, this ambitiously epic biography of Frank Sinatra (1915-1998) reads like a movie biopic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRANK by Barney Frank
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 17, 2015

"Much more entertaining than most political memoirs, Frank's story isn't just revealing; it may be the most fun you can have reading about the United States Congress."
Now that the fiery, occasionally dyspeptic congressman has left office, he lets the air out in a memoir that feels like it's just the thing the long-serving politician has wanted to publish. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRANK by L.J. Alonge
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"More than just sports stories, the books in the series are about characters trying to find their ways in life. (Fiction. 12-18)"
The third book in the Blacktop series features Frank Torres as he navigates the courts (basketball and law), streets, and classrooms of his hometown of Oakland, California. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRANK by Connah Brecon
by Connah Brecon, illustrated by Connah Brecon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 2014

"Zany but forgettable. (Picture book. 4-7)"
This helpful little bear is such a good Samaritan that he's always late for school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 5, 2006

"Wynne employs all the devices of an expert roman policier."
A spectacular story of vengeance and fraud told with verve and style by British journalist Wynne, translator to English of Michel Houellebecq's The Elementary Particles, 2000, among others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIREFIGHTER FRANK by Monica Wellington
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Dedicated to the firefighters of New York City, this tribute to this challenging profession is sure to inspire children who dream of one day wearing the uniform. (Picture book. 3-6)"
While waiting for the alarm to sound, Firefight Frank finds many things to do around the firehouse, but he must drop everything when the bell begins to signal that his help is needed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ELEMENTARY PARTICLES by Michel Houellebecq
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2000

"Much of the time clumsy, but fiercely interesting."
Houellebecq, who writes in French and lives in Dublin, offers a second try (after Whatever, 1999) that's said to be a hit abroad. Often pretentious—or flat-footed—it nevertheless holds the reader solidly with its guess about mankind's biological future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARRAGA by Boualem Sansal
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 6, 2014

"Sansal's richly drawn characters and the places where he embeds them will color readers' moods long after we leave their passageways."
Two women, a pediatrician considered a spinster at 35 and a spontaneous, pregnant teenager, forge a strong, unlikely emotional bond after a short time living together in a 17th-century house in Rampe Valée, a crumbling neighborhood in contemporary Algiers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINDOWS ON THE WORLD by Frederic Beigbeder
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"Sometimes slight, but always impressive: an important addition to the chorus of heavier, more lifeless tomes on the subject."
From the restaurant that once had the best views in town, 9/11 is witnessed minute by agonizing minute. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE ABSENCE OF MEN by Philippe Besson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2003

"It's more akin to Françoise Sagan's once-notorious Bonjour Tristesse."
In this relentlessly mournful récit, Vincent de l'Etoile, a youth of godlike beauty and initially confused sexuality (who is, at age 16, "as old as the century"), reveals his chance friendship with a middle-aged author named Marcel and his passionate love for Arthur Valès, a doomed soldier. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMEWHERE IN A DESERT by Dominique Sigaud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Earnest, well intended, conscientious—and half-real at best."
Sigaud's debut (a prize-winner in France) is a self-consciously artful cry against war, but, with its paper-thin people, readers aren—t very likely to find it moving. Read full book review >